Art period – Modern Art For Kids http://www.modernartforkids.com/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 17:49:32 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://www.modernartforkids.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/icon-6.png Art period – Modern Art For Kids http://www.modernartforkids.com/ 32 32 MHC students fight menstrual poverty with ‘Bleeding Us Dry’ campaign https://www.modernartforkids.com/mhc-students-fight-menstrual-poverty-with-bleeding-us-dry-campaign/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 15:38:23 +0000 https://www.modernartforkids.com/mhc-students-fight-menstrual-poverty-with-bleeding-us-dry-campaign/ Third-year Medicine Hat College art students Alyssa Fonteyne, Jenna Maertz, Jorden MacPhee and Katelyn Richard were the group that spearheaded this year’s Time of Poverty campaign, themed Bleeding Us Dry. The campaign lasted two weeks, from November 1 to 15. “We were more behind the scenes,” Maertz said. “We were thinking about how ‘Bleeding Us […]]]>

Third-year Medicine Hat College art students Alyssa Fonteyne, Jenna Maertz, Jorden MacPhee and Katelyn Richard were the group that spearheaded this year’s Time of Poverty campaign, themed Bleeding Us Dry.

The campaign lasted two weeks, from November 1 to 15.

“We were more behind the scenes,” Maertz said. “We were thinking about how ‘Bleeding Us Dry’ relates to money and how it (menstruation) literally bleeds us out of money.”

Richard wanted to play on this idea and on women having to choose between buying food, household items, bills or buying period products.

“We came up with the idea of ​​begging on the street for vintage goods rather than cash,” she said. “That’s where we got the idea for the campaign. We really liked the idea of ​​the cardboard panel. We used it as a reminder throughout the campaign.

At first the group did a photo shoot, but their instructor, Ian Richmond, really liked the panel, so they opted for that.

“We took photos of the people around the community (with the sign) and made a blurb of their story about how they can relate to it (time of poverty),” Maertz said.

The panels were all handmade because the band loved the artisanal side. For each person they photographed, they added a different tagline, such as: “on the rag” or “this time of the month.”

MacPhee talked about how embarrassing it is that men avoid the topic or don’t buy menstrual products.

“There aren’t a lot of guys in our program to start with, so I’m surrounded by women,” MacPhee said. “Katelyn is my girlfriend and she has period issues. I see it all the time. I grew up with my mom and sister at home. Seeing all of this and seeing how scared some guys are to talk about it or going to buy menstrual products sucks.It’s literally no different than buying cotton balls, it’s just a product in a box.

Fonteyne is passionate about the subject and identifies with the struggle of women.

“I don’t think periods should be stigmatized and it’s frustrating to see people hesitate or be embarrassed by them,” she said. “I don’t think men should make a fuss about it. It’s just a normal human function and a lot of people go through it. I was really happy to be part of the campaign.

The goal of the annual campaign is to raise awareness while raising funds or donations of menstrual products that can be donated to Root Cellar for distribution to the wider community. As of this writing, the total amount raised through this year’s campaign is unknown.

SAMANTHA JOHNSON, Local Journalism Initiative reporter, Medicine Hat News

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Indiana Jones 5 Setting and Time Period Revealed https://www.modernartforkids.com/indiana-jones-5-setting-and-time-period-revealed/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 03:58:00 +0000 https://www.modernartforkids.com/indiana-jones-5-setting-and-time-period-revealed/ The first details of Indiana Jones 5’s story emerge, revealing that its setting is at least partially set in New York and its 1960s period. New pouch for Indiana Jones 5 confirms the setting and timeline for the long-awaited sequel. Indiana Jones 5 is set to premiere on June 30, 2023, 15 years after the […]]]>

The first details of Indiana Jones 5’s story emerge, revealing that its setting is at least partially set in New York and its 1960s period.


New pouch for Indiana Jones 5 confirms the setting and timeline for the long-awaited sequel. Indiana Jones 5 is set to premiere on June 30, 2023, 15 years after the release of the fourth installment in the series. The lengthy delay was the result of Lucasfilm’s move under Disney ownership and the company’s decision to revitalize the star wars deductible before working IndianaJones. Filming was further delayed when Steve Spielberg decided to step down from the project as director and was replaced by James Mangold, although after a host of delays the project began to become a reality.

VIDEO OF THE DAY

Empire Review unveiled its exclusive Indiana Jones 5 cover inspired by the premise of the film. The magazine offered a first look at the long-awaited return of Jones (Harrison Ford), though subscribers received special treatment with the illustrated subscriber-only cover. Breathtaking art by Sam Hadley sees Jones standing in a 1960s New York City as skyscrapers tower over him and golden light surrounds the city, offering the first glimpse of Indiana Jones 5the setting and the time period. Check out the cover below:

Related: The Complete Indiana Jones Movie Timeline Explained


What Indiana Jones 5’s New York Setting and Timeline Reveals

harrison-ford-in-indiana-jones-5-on-a-boat

Few details have been revealed about Indiana Jones 5, but its setting and timeline provided some clues as to what to expect. Prior to its confirmation, the 1960s timeline had been widely rumored, in part because it was only natural for the film to pick up in this time frame, given that the previous film was set in 1957 and the delays in Indiana Jones 5 meant that it was impossible to conceal the fact that at least two years had passed. Meanwhile, the 1960s creates the perfect setting to further explore the Cold War between America and the Soviet Union.

Since Ford teased this Indiana Jones 5 will see the titular character at the end of his journey, it will be interesting to see how far after the previous film, Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull, it’s happening, with the 2008 sequel set in 1957. With nearly 15 years between the two releases, you’d think the story would follow, though the new cover art confirming a 60s setting seems to indicate less than a decade of separation. . Bringing the quintessentially globe-trotting franchise to the United States proves to be an interesting break from the IndianaJones formula, even if it only turns out for a sequence or two, as Ford was spotted in character throughout the film’s sets in London and Italy.

Whereas Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull didn’t receive praise for its inclusion of aliens, it showed that the franchise isn’t afraid to dabble in the realm of science fiction. The 1960s being the decade of the arms race and the first moon landing, it would not be surprising if Indiana Jones 5 addresses some outer space phenomena, but hopefully in a way that better suits the audience. The New York premise could also support this theory, as the city was the location of a ticker parade held for the Apollo 11 crew upon their return from space. It’s hard to say what exactly Indiana Jones 5 will be on point, but with the film wrapping up Ford’s tenure in the role, audiences are sure to come out in droves when it’s released on June 30, 2023.

Next: Indiana Jones 5 Will Ignore Lucas’ Earlier Wish (And That’s A Good Thing)

Source: Empire Review

Key release date

  • indiana jones 5 poster

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Blue Period: Season 2 – Release Date, Story and What You Need to Know https://www.modernartforkids.com/blue-period-season-2-release-date-story-and-what-you-need-to-know/ Wed, 16 Nov 2022 09:00:10 +0000 https://www.modernartforkids.com/blue-period-season-2-release-date-story-and-what-you-need-to-know/ No other anime depicts the struggles of an aspiring artist better than Blue period. Written by Tsubasa Yamaguchi, the story follows Yatora Yaguchi, a college student who eventually found his passion in pursuing art. Its anime adaptation began airing in September 2021 and ended airing in December of the same year. It’s been almost a […]]]>

No other anime depicts the struggles of an aspiring artist better than Blue period. Written by Tsubasa Yamaguchi, the story follows Yatora Yaguchi, a college student who eventually found his passion in pursuing art. Its anime adaptation began airing in September 2021 and ended airing in December of the same year. It’s been almost a year since Season 1 ended, so fans are wondering when Blue Period: Season 2 will come out.

When is Blue Period: Season 2 coming out?

Unfortunately, there is still no confirmed release date for Blue Period: Season 2, so it is unclear if there will be a season 2 as there is no news regarding a renewal. Despite that, you shouldn’t give up hope that Blue Period will eventually get a sequel in the future.

The Blue Period manga has exceeded 4.5 million copies in circulation. With its popularity, there is a chance that there will be a second season down the line. However, it probably won’t be released this year, so we can expect 2023 at the earliest for season 2 to come out.

What is Blue Period: Season 2 about? (Spoiler alert)

If they decide to do Blue Period: Season 2, it will cover the freshman college arc. Assuming it picks up where it left off, Season 2 will start from Volume 7, Chapter 26 of the manga. Also, if it follows Season 1, where they host 25 chapters, Season 2 will reach the mini-arc of Saeki’s drawing class and the sophomore college arc.

With Yaguchi’s successful entry into Tokyo University of the Arts, new challenges await our protagonist next season. Since he is surrounded by the best art students in Japan, Yaguchi will have to prove himself despite his inexperience. Additionally, Yaguchi and his rival, Yotasuke, would deepen their friendship the following season.

Which studio is making Blue Period: Season 2

The first season was hosted by seven bows, so there is a good chance that they will host Season 2 as well. Seven Arcs is also known for hosting other anime, such as Magical Girl Lyrical Nanoha, Fly Me to the Moon, and Trinity Seven. However, despite how animated Season 1 was, a change in Blue Period’s animation studio isn’t out of order.

Some fans argued that the anime was lackluster compared to the manga. They said the anime was rushed and failed to capture the depth of its source material. Yet, despite the poor animation, many people found the anime very motivating and connected to their struggles, so they still recommend watching the anime or reading the manga.

Where will Blue Period: Season 2 air?

Like its previous season, Blue Period: Season 2 will most likely release on netflix. Unlike other anime, which can be streamed on multiple streaming services, Netflix is ​​the only streaming service to stream Blue Period internationally. For Japanese people, Season 2 will also air on the Super Animeism Block on MBS, TBS and other channels, if it is the same with Season 1.

READ NEXT: Classroom of the Elite: Season 3 – Release date, story and what you need to know

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NCAA Early Signing Period: Signings Expected in the Indianapolis Area https://www.modernartforkids.com/ncaa-early-signing-period-signings-expected-in-the-indianapolis-area/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 09:06:12 +0000 https://www.modernartforkids.com/ncaa-early-signing-period-signings-expected-in-the-indianapolis-area/ The early signing period for basketball and other sports begins Wednesday. Here is an overview of the confirmed expected signings for local schools (will be updated). If you know an athlete who should sign, email kyle.neddenriep@indystar.com men’s basketball Xavier Booker, Cathedral (State of Michigan) Jake Davis, Cathedral (Mercer) Zane Doughty, Ben Davis (Valparaiso) Kamari Jones, […]]]>

The early signing period for basketball and other sports begins Wednesday. Here is an overview of the confirmed expected signings for local schools (will be updated). If you know an athlete who should sign, email kyle.neddenriep@indystar.com

men’s basketball

Xavier Booker, Cathedral (State of Michigan)

Jake Davis, Cathedral (Mercer)

Zane Doughty, Ben Davis (Valparaiso)

Kamari Jones, Lawrence Central (West Carolina)

Sam Orme, Carmel (Belmont)

women’s basketball

Teegan Acres, Hamilton Southeast (Huntington)

Olivia Brown, Hamilton Southeast (Akron)

Cristen Carter, Ben Davis (Miami of Ohio)

Layla Gold, Cathedral (Valparaiso)

Lizzie Graham, Triton Central (IU-South Bend)

Sydney Horton, Roncalli (Trine)

Hannah Lach, Carmel (DePauw)

Riley Makalusky, Hamilton Southeast (butler)

Kailyn Terrell, Brownsburg (Southeast Nova)

Monica Williams, Lawrence North (Ohio)

Baseball

David Ayers, Cathedral (butler)

Barile Garrison, Center Grove, Miami

Eli Bridenthal, Mount Vernon (Xavier)

Caden Cornett, Center Grove (Purdue Fort Wayne)

Rex Culbertson, Center Grove, Missouri

Kyuss Gargett, Cathedral (Kentucky)

Cameron Heaney, Carmel (Land of the Lakes)

Dylan Keever, Noblesville (IU-Kokomo)

Carter Klein, Carmel (Land of the Lakes)

Seth Nanna, Westfield (Lewis)

Nathan Olsen, Lawrence North (IU-Kokomo)

Kevin Reed, Martinsville (Evansville)

Bryce Riggs, Noblesville (Eastern Illinois)

Grant Sawa, Center Grove (Purdue Fort Wayne)

Nate Simpson, Avon (Purdue Fort Wayne)

Cas Sullivan, Carmel (Marshall)

Evan Zapp, Center Grove (Queens University of Charlotte)

Women’s football

Lauren Adam, Noblesville (Purdue)

Ava Bramblett, Noblesville, OH

Bishop Chatard Brianna Buels (10) steals the ball during the City Tournament game at Bishop Chatard High School, Indianapolis.  Cathedral Fighting Irish defeated Bishop Chatard Trojans, 3-0.

Brianna Buels, Bishop Chatard (Missouri)

Tatum Coleman, Hamilton Southeast (Valparaiso)

Claire Donald, Tri-West (St. Mary of the Woods)

Bethany Ducat, Carmel (Savannah College of Art & Design)

Farmer Kayli, Center Grove (Dayton)

Cassidy Felger, Hamilton Heights (Grace)

Kate Hardin, Tri-West (Indiana University-Purdue University Columbus)

Kylie Hardin, Tri-West (Indiana University-Purdue University Columbus)

Meskerem James, Noblesville (Taylor)

Noah Jordan, Roncalli (Hanover)

Emily Karr, Center Grove (Evansville)

Caroline Kelley, Hamilton Southeast (IUPUI)

Sammie King, North Central (Bowling Green)

Cece Leffler, Bishop Chatard (State of Kent)

Kate Phillips, Cathedral (Missouri)

Tammie Shalit, Westfield (Tiffin)

Maryn Weiger, North Central (Mercer)

Nadia Zaborowski, Noblesville (army)

men’s soccer

Luke Kegerreis, Roncalli (Xavier)

Landon Huber, Noblesville (Wabash)

Owen Mejia, Noblesville (army)

Volleyball

Emerson Evans, Carmel (Indiana University of Pennsylvania)

Gabby Gilbert, Pike (Norfolk State)

Avery Hobson, Hamilton Southeast (Duquesne)

Mallory Neale, Westfield (South Charleston)

Elle Patterson, Tri-West (Fairfield)

Jessica Pickett, Carmel (Valparaiso)

Ava Rundle, Noblesville, Indiana

Quinci Thomas, Brownsburg (Xavier)

Molly Urban, Martinsville, Louisville

Emily Waddell, Carmel, Ohio

Julianna Weems, Center Grove (Concordia)

Gabby Weihe, Noblesville (Western Kentucky)

soft ball

Lyla Blackwell, Roncalli (Virginia Tech)

Erin Clark, Noblesville (butler)

Allie Dolenc, Westfield (Lincoln Land CC)

Kylee Edwards, Shelbyville, Mississippi

Sophie Esposito, Carmel, Indiana State

Marley Gearld, Danville (northern Kentucky)

Morgan Hicks, Hamilton Southeast (Valparaiso)

Hofmann Abbey, Roncalli (Maria)

Kaitlyn Leister, Roncalli (IU-Southeast)

Mandy Lauth, Avon (George Washington)

Destiny Loeb, Lawrence North (Lincoln Land)

Amanda Logeais, Avon (Mount St. Joseph)

Lauren Marsicek, Roncalli (Indiana State)

Nicole Mathews, Tri-West (Lincoln Trail)

Hope McDonald, Carmel, Coastal Carolina

Addy Neal, Brownsburg (India)

Lainey Price, Tri-West (Danville CC area)

Karson Pruitt, Martinsville (Franklin)

Margaret Roh, Westfield (Toledo)

Roncalli High School pitcher Keagan Rothrock (7) is greeted by Anne Marie Meek (16) of Roncalli High School after a strike, Wednesday, May 25, 2022, in the 4A Sectional Softball Final won by Roncalli 10 -0.

Keagan Rothrock, Roncalli (Florida)

Bella Schatko, Noblesville (Earlham)

Reis Sjoholm, Noblesville (Toledo)

Maddie Starnes, Brownsburg (Wilmington)

Ava Sullivan, Tri-West (Purdue Fort Wayne)

Lily Sullivan, Carmel (Akron)

Lexi Thatcher, Bishop Chatard (Samford)

Taylor Thompson, Noblesville (central Missouri)

Women’s Cross Country

Lily Cridge, Bishop Chatard (Oregon)

Men’s Cross Country

Ty Garrett, Center Grove (Wake Forest)

Kole Mathison, Carmel, Colorado

Parker Mimbela, Center Grove (State of Indiana)

Alex Mundt, Carmel (Maria)

Asher Propst, Noblesville (butler)

Charlie Stuelpe, Carmel (Hanover)

Women’s athletics

Shelby Wingler, Center Grove, Kentucky

Women’s swimming and diving

Berit Berglund, Carmel, Texas

Meghan Christman, Carmel (Notre Dame)

Erin Cummins, Carmel, Indiana

Kathryn Harrison, Westfield (University of the Cumberlands)

Grace Hurley, Bishop Chatard (Alabama)

Keira Kask, Carmel (Purdue)

Ella Penny, Hamilton Southeast (Ball State)

Ash Saple, Hamilton Southeast (Indiana State)

Anna Stolle, Hamilton Southeast (Hope)

Vivian Wilson, Carmel, Arizona

Men’s swimming and diving

Aidan Biddle, Noblesville (Ball State)

Andrew Robertson, Carmel (Purdue)

male golf

Sage Parsetich, Center Grove (Indiana Wesleyan)

William Pruitt, Bishop Chatard (Marian)

Brady Schier, Center Grove (IUPUI)

Matthew Shull, Westfield (Grace)

Cole Starnes, Hamilton Southeast, Indiana

female golf

Emma Fair, Center Grove (Purdue North West)

Haley Fuhr, Center Grove (IU-Southeast)

Anna Rickey, Hamilton Heights (Grace)

Claire Thompson, Westfield (Sainte Marie des Bois)

Caroline Whallon, Noblesville (India)

Ashlynn Wolff, Center Grove (Washburn)

Gymnastic

D’ahni Branch, Carmel (Baylor)

Leah Fredericks, Carmel (Baylor)

Elizabeth Gantner, Roncalli (Utah)

Ava Jordan, Cathedral (Michigan)

men’s lacrosse

Mason Bardwell, Carmel, Vermont

Blaine Casey, Brownsburg (India)

Christian Dybedock, Brownsburg (Wabash)

Alexander Edwards, Brownsburg (Indiana Institute of Technology)

Kyle Fedorcha, Carmel (Bryant)

Quinn Huber, Carmel (Canisius)

Ben Wollenmann, Noblesville (Anderson)

Women’s Lacrosse

Kristina Cutsinger, Center Grove (Thomas More)

Alex Dean, Hamilton Southeast (Marian)

Kara McCarthy, Cathedral (Rockhurst)

Elle Nawa, Hamilton Southeastern (Army)

Tori Tomalia, Carmel (UConn)

Struggle

Cheaney Schoeff, Avon (State of North Carolina)

Andrew Sweet, Brownsburg (Mount St. Joseph)

women’s rowing

Avon Olson, Hamilton Southeast, Indiana

Call Star reporter Kyle Neddenriep at (317) 444-6649.

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Two third period goals help Warriors win at Prince Albert – DiscoverMooseJaw.com https://www.modernartforkids.com/two-third-period-goals-help-warriors-win-at-prince-albert-discovermoosejaw-com/ Sat, 05 Nov 2022 16:34:03 +0000 https://www.modernartforkids.com/two-third-period-goals-help-warriors-win-at-prince-albert-discovermoosejaw-com/ The Moose Jaw Warriors finished strong against the Prince Albert Raiders on Friday night to come away with a big win to open the weekend. Jagger Firkus scored the game-winning goal, shorthanded in the third period to help the Warriors come back 3-2 against the Raiders at the Art Hauser Center. “I like that we […]]]>

The Moose Jaw Warriors finished strong against the Prince Albert Raiders on Friday night to come away with a big win to open the weekend.

Jagger Firkus scored the game-winning goal, shorthanded in the third period to help the Warriors come back 3-2 against the Raiders at the Art Hauser Center.

“I like that we hung on, we got a few saves from our goaltender and we got through it,” Warriors assistant coach Scott King said.

“PA come as advertised, they are a tough team to face in this building. They generate a lot of energy here.

The Warriors trailed 2-1 heading into the third period, but goals from Firkus and Riley Ginnell just 1:06 apart early in the period tipped the game in favor of Moose Jaw.

Ginnell’s goal didn’t come until 4:19 of the third period and landed a big ape in the back of the 20-year-old forward as it was his first since being acquired by the Warriors.

“It was a great moment in the game and for him, I’m sure it feels good for him,” King said.

Both of Prince Albert’s goals came on the power play as they finished the night 2 for 5, including three power plays in the third. The Warriors didn’t score in their two power-play opportunities.

King said the Warriors needed to play in a more disciplined way.

“You can be physical and obviously it’s about being on the right side of the pucks and if you do that you’re usually in a good place where you don’t have to take a penalty,” he said. declared.

Prince Albert opened the scoring late in the first period on a goal by Landon Kosior.

The Warriors were able to respond straight away with Robert Baco blasting his second of the season to tie the game at 1-1 after one.

The Raiders scored the only goal in the second when Nolan Allan snagged a power-play marker to make it 2-1 after two.

The Warriors’ fast hitting early in the third period gave them some breathing room and some big saves from Connor Ungar on the penalty kill sealed the victory.

Ungar made 25 saves, including 10 in third, in the win.

The Warriors will now head home for a big battle with the Red Deer Rebels, who beat Swift Current to move to 14-0-0-0 this season.

CLICK HERE TO BUY TICKETS FOR THE SATURDAY MATCH

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Pakistan Refinery: Submission of quarterly accounts for the period ended September 30, 2022 https://www.modernartforkids.com/pakistan-refinery-submission-of-quarterly-accounts-for-the-period-ended-september-30-2022/ Mon, 31 Oct 2022 10:22:14 +0000 https://www.modernartforkids.com/pakistan-refinery-submission-of-quarterly-accounts-for-the-period-ended-september-30-2022/ VISION The Refinery of choice for everyone stakeholders. ASSIGNMENT To produce superior quality and environment-friendly products through safe operations, advanced technology and first-rate human resources. TABLE CONTENT Company Profile / Information 03 board of directors 04 Directors’ review 05 Condensed Interim Statement of Financial Position 06 Condensed Interim Statement of Profit or […]]]>


VISION

The Refinery of choice for everyone

stakeholders.

ASSIGNMENT

To produce superior quality and environment-friendly products through safe operations, advanced technology and first-rate human resources.

TABLE CONTENT

Company Profile / Information

03

board of directors

04

Directors’ review

05

Condensed Interim Statement of Financial Position

06

Condensed Interim Statement of Profit or Loss and

the other extended result

07

Condensed Interim Statement of Changes in Equity – (unaudited)

08

Condensed Interim Statement of Cash Flows – (unaudited)

09

Notes and forming part of the financial report

Statements – (unaudited)

ten

COMPANY PROFILE

PRL is a hydro-skimming refinery incorporated in Pakistan as a limited company in May 1960. The company is engaged in the production and sale of petroleum products. The Company is a subsidiary of Pakistan State Oil Company Limited (PSO). The shares of the Company are listed on the Pakistan Stock Exchange Limited.

The refinery is located in Karachi with a planned throughput capacity of 50,000 barrels per day. The main units installed at the refinery are the crude distillation unit, the hydrotreating unit, the platform unit and the isomerization unit.

REPORT 30 SEPTEMBER 2022

COMPANY INFORMATION

Deputy General Director

(Finance & IT) / Chief Financial Officer

Imran Ahmad Mirza

Company Secretary

Shehrzad Aminullah

Auditors and tax advisers

KPMG-Taseer Hadi & Co.

Chartered Accountants

Legal advisers

Orr Dignam & Co.

Share register and registry office

FAMCO Associates (Private) Limited.

8-F, near Faran Hotel, Nursery, Block-6, PECHS, Shahra-e-Faisal, Karachi.

bankers

Askari Bank Limited

Bank Alfalah Limited

Bank AL-Habib Limited

Faysal Bank Limited

Habib Metropolitan Bank Limited

Habib Bank Limited

JS Bank Limited

MCB Bank Limited

MCB Islamic Bank Limited

Meezan Bank Limited

National Bank of Pakistan

Soneri Bank Limited

Standard Chartered Bank (Pakistan) Limited

The Bank of Punjab Limited

united bank limited

The head office

PO Box 4612, Korangi Creek Road, Karachi-75190. Tel: (92-21)35122131-40 Fax: (92-21) 35060145, 35091780 info@prl.com.pk

www.prl.com.pk

This is an excerpt from the original content. To continue reading it, access the original document here.

Disclaimer

Pakistan Refinery Ltd. published this content on October 31, 2022 and is solely responsible for the information contained therein. Distributed by Public, unedited and unmodified, on Oct 31, 2022 10:21:04 AM UTC.

Public now 2022

All news from PAKISTAN REFINERY LIMITED

2022 sales 191B
867M
867M
2022 net income 12,573 million
57.0 million
57.0 million
Net cash 2022 4,489 million
20.3 million
20.3 million
PER 2022 ratio 0.90x
2022 return
Capitalization 10,811M
49.0M
49.0M
EV / Sales 2021 0.36x
EV / Sales 2022 0.04x
# of employees 273
Floating 0.00%

Chart PAKISTAN REFINERY LIMITED


Duration :

Period :




Pakistan Refinery Limited Technical Analysis Chart |  MarketScreener

Technical Analysis Trends PAKISTAN REFINERY LIMITED

Short term Middle term Long term
Tendencies Neutral Neutral Bullish




Evolution of the income statement


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Sudheer Babu’s 18th Period Action Movie With Divine Elements https://www.modernartforkids.com/sudheer-babus-18th-period-action-movie-with-divine-elements/ Thu, 27 Oct 2022 08:55:18 +0000 https://www.modernartforkids.com/sudheer-babus-18th-period-action-movie-with-divine-elements/ Tollywood actor Sudheer Babu has dabbled in films of different genres and undergone physical transformations, depending on the demands of the characters he portrays. Thursday saw the official announcement of Sudheer Babu’s 18th film. He will team up with director Gnanasagar Dwaraka who made his debut with ‘Sehari’. Sumanth G. Naidu will produce the film […]]]>

Tollywood actor Sudheer Babu has dabbled in films of different genres and undergone physical transformations, depending on the demands of the characters he portrays. Thursday saw the official announcement of Sudheer Babu’s 18th film.

He will team up with director Gnanasagar Dwaraka who made his debut with ‘Sehari’. Sumanth G. Naidu will produce the film under the SSC (Sree Subrahmanyeshwara Cinemas) banner.

The announcement poster shows an inside letter card from Arun Gowli of South Bombay to Subramanyam of Kuppam in the Chittoor district. The message reads: “Critical: your arrival is required.” A temple and village scene can be seen in the poster which also features a gun, bullets, an old rupee note, a landline phone and a cigar. Mass Sambhavam on October 31,” the makers announced, hinting at an update coming the same day.

It is a period action drama with a divine element and the story is set in 1989 in Kuppam. It is a true nativity movie that will feature Sudheer Babu in a never-before-seen mass avatar. The actor who is the brother-in-law of superstar Mahesh Babu is going to get a makeover for this movie.

The makers will announce more details about the film soon.

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How the Nobel Prize-winning songwriter turned to art, with a little whiskey-making to boot https://www.modernartforkids.com/how-the-nobel-prize-winning-songwriter-turned-to-art-with-a-little-whiskey-making-to-boot/ Mon, 24 Oct 2022 15:27:58 +0000 https://www.modernartforkids.com/how-the-nobel-prize-winning-songwriter-turned-to-art-with-a-little-whiskey-making-to-boot/ American musician Bob Dylan performs at the London Feis Festival, Finsbury Park, on Saturday June 18 … [+] 2011, just weeks after his 70th birthday. (AP Photo/Joel Ryan) Copyright 2011AP. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed. In May this year, Provençal winemaker Château La Coste announced the unveiling […]]]>

In May this year, Provençal winemaker Château La Coste announced the unveiling of an unusual sculpture, of Nobel laureate and songwriter Bob Dylan, to be installed on his famous art trail winding through the vineyards of the castle. The new acquisition was a large rectangular structure of steel and iron – a sort of giant pergola of the industrial age – welded to a frame of a railway boxcar. Together with the frame, the work forms what might be called an open-air covered wagon, shown below.

Dylan’s work is replete with railway and agricultural metaphors from the 19th and early 20th centuries. Welded into its trellis is a plow rod, a few shards of ornamental cast iron, a Palladian crossbeam, gears, wheels, a ladder or two, a piece of a railroad worker’s oversized wrench and spike for hitching and unhitching cars, a scythe (or a scythe -up to one), at least a socket wrench for removing automobile tires, all kinds of rods and framing. In terms of artistic ancestry, this is done in the quirky, poetic industrial style of iconic American iron sculptor David Smith.

But unlike Smith’s more elaborate and intricate work, the effect of Dylan’s assemblage is that of a surprisingly tidy patchwork quilt (in iron and steel), as he framed tools and architectural remains. so securely in panels of fabricated steel. The dimensions of the room are, by definition, within the cutthroat dimensions of the boxcar chassis. You can walk through the Château La Coste sculpture the full length of the covered wagon, which is even more fun. But arguably the most amusing detail is that its author is America’s prolific rolling stone and our most recent (2016) winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature. In his typically enigmatic and brooding Upper Midwestern lingua franca, Dylan titled the piece “Rail Car.”

That Dylan has chops in the figurative arts is well known. He introduced us to this by making a light, brutal but impressionistic oil of himself the cover of his self-titled 1970 album, self-portraitand for the past half-century he’s been stocking up on album covers, hosting art shows, and going to his studio in Malibu, Calif., to sweat it all out.

Lately – that is, in the last decade – he has become a fan of the oxy-acetylene torch and the welder’s arc. ‘Rail Car’ is Dylan’s largest metal sculpture to date, but he has also held exhibitions of his genre exercises in London and the United States. That some of this output is overtly commercial — that is, apparently made to contract, as with the “Portal” piece framing an entrance to the MGM casino in Washington, D.C. — might come as a surprise to the famed author. nasty politics of “The Masters of War. But his era of protest was back then, well over half a century ago, in 1966, when Dylan surfed on budding opposition to the Vietnam War. That was then, this is now.

Much less known than his art is Dylan’s new partnership with veteran distiller Mark Bushala. Together they produce Heaven’s Door whiskies, the name of which is derived from the Nobel laureate’s best-selling world anthem, “Knocking On Heaven’s Door”, written for the 1973 film soundtrack. Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid, in which Dylan made a famous appearance as a murderous, knife-throwing bandit in the Lincoln County Wars. Heaven’s Door offers four “Tennessee Bourbons” and a rye in the $50-80 premium range, with a commemorative box featuring a reproduction of a $500 Dylan painting.

The Heaven’s Door releases garnered excellent reviews from critics, despite the fact that aside from the ever-iconoclastic Dylan, no Tennessee distiller makes bourbon as such. They make “Tennessee Whisky”. But in partnership with Bushala, Dylan is stepping up his efforts, planning what we can only call a rare foray into hospitality, with a new distillery in Nashville, which will be housed in a 163-year-old desecrated church in the trendy neighborhood. from SoBro to Music City. . Even more commercial than all of this put together, the project for a kind of Bob Dylan boutique hotel adjoins the distillery and, not least, a gallery to exhibit, you guessed it, the paintings and sculptures of the bourbon maker. .

In the five months since its installation, it is fair to say that “Rail Car” has worked well for Château La Coste and for its outdoor location in the vineyards. The work delivers a projection of a city crossed by Dylan’s metaphorical train. It could be any city, but it has a strong Midwestern American flavor to it, as you’d expect from the Duluth, Minnesota native. One stream of influence that can certainly inform Dylan’s metallurgical work is that little Robert Allen Zimmerman spent much of his childhood in Hibbing, Minnesota – an iron mining town.

Given that one of the persistent metaphors in songs written about Dylan’s six-decade musical career is that of a life spent on the road, “Rail Car” takes on several more layers of meaning. Indeed, the manufacturer tells us the story of every little whistle by presenting us with an archaeological Baedeker of the structures and tools of the inhabitants. That means the best way to see “Rail Car” is by definition from the inside, as a passenger on Dylan’s train, because in the art you see the city go by. It’s a snapshot of how our vision works from a train. Given the source, it’s a natural history to wring out a ton of iron.

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Harvest Report – For the period October 11 to 17, 2022 https://www.modernartforkids.com/harvest-report-for-the-period-october-11-to-17-2022/ Fri, 21 Oct 2022 16:03:00 +0000 https://www.modernartforkids.com/harvest-report-for-the-period-october-11-to-17-2022/ Photo submitted. The Minister of AgricultureSubmitted Harvest is virtually complete across Saskatchewan as dry weather through much of September and October allowed growers to harvest their crops efficiently without major weather delays. Harvesting started early for many growers in the southwest and midwest regions after another dry growing season. Late planting dates and weekly rainfall […]]]>
Photo submitted.

The Minister of Agriculture
Submitted

Harvest is virtually complete across Saskatchewan as dry weather through much of September and October allowed growers to harvest their crops efficiently without major weather delays.

Harvesting started early for many growers in the southwest and midwest regions after another dry growing season. Late planting dates and weekly rainfall during the flowering and seed-filling stages delayed harvest in the eastern and northern parts of the province until the second half of August, but resulted in the potential for higher yield. However, the weather remained dry and growers were able to speed up their harvest and bring in their entire harvest without major issues.

Now that harvest is complete in all parts of the province, growers would like to see regular precipitation before the ground freezes and winter arrives.

Crop yields vary across the province and are highly dependent on the amount of moisture received throughout the season. Yields in the Southwest and Midwest regions are again below average, with some growers reporting slightly improved yields compared to last year. Yields in the eastern and northern regions have improved a lot, and many growers are reporting above-average yields. The biggest impacts on yields this year were drought, ground squirrels, grasshoppers, wind and spring drowned crops.

Average yields are estimated at 44 bushels per acre for hard red spring wheat, 31 bushels per acre for durum wheat, 93 bushels per acre for oats, 64 bushels per acre for barley, 36 bushels per acre for for canola, 34 bushels per acre for peas. and 1,165 pounds per acre for lentils.

Quality ratings for all crops are largely in the top two categories for each respective crop. The largest contributors to the downgrade were light kernels due to drought, insect damage, bleaching or discoloration of kernels from rain, and an increase in diseases such as ergot in grain crops such as spring wheat and durum wheat.

Moisture conditions are a concern for some growers, especially those who have struggled throughout the season with infrequent and minimal rainfall. Even areas that started the year with excess moisture are now becoming very dry and growers are hoping for rain soon.

Significant rainfall will be required this fall and through winter to replenish moisture levels in the soil and dugouts. As winter approaches, cropland topsoil moisture is rated as adequate at 22%, short at 35%, and very short at 43%. Hay and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as adequate at 16%, short at 37%, and very short at 47%.

Hay yields have improved significantly across most of the province as increased amounts of precipitation allowed for early growth and rapid regrowth throughout the growing season. Haylands in the southwest and midwest again suffered from near-drought conditions, resulting in less than optimal hay yields. Provincially, average dryland hay yields are 1.4 tonnes per acre (alfalfa), 1.4 tonnes per acre (alfalfa/bromeed and wild hay), 1.10 tonnes per acre (other tame hay) and 2 tons per acre (green fodder). On irrigated land, average estimated hay yields are 2 tons per acre (alfalfa), 2.3 tons per acre (alfalfa/bromeed), 1.5 tons per acre (wild hay), and 3 tons per acre (forage). green). Most of the incoming hay in winter is rated as fair to excellent, with only one percent rated as poor.

Due to improved hay yields, winter feed supplies for livestock, such as cattle, have also improved. Producers in the northern and eastern regions have indicated that they will have excess or adequate supplies of hay, straw, green forage and feed grains. Producers in the southwest and mid-west report that they have not been able to fully replenish their feed stocks and are sourcing from other parts of the province, with some buying hay from Alberta or Manitoba. For some producers, their feed inventory is too depleted and the feed too expensive to buy, causing them to reduce their herd size to accommodate the feed available to them.

Water hauling was once again common in many parts of the province as dugouts, swamps and other bodies of water dry up and become unsafe for livestock. Producers constantly tested water quality and were forced to move livestock off pastures that had unsafe water, putting increased pressure on already struggling grasslands. More rain and above average snowfall this winter are needed to ensure that water quantity and quality will not be an issue next year.

Now that the harvest is complete, farmers will be able to complete fall chores such as repairing fences, moving livestock, hauling grain and bales, picking rocks and other miscellaneous field work. Farmers will continue to do their work in the field until the ground freezes or a heavy snowfall occurs.

This is the final crop report for the 2022 growing season.

Northeast Saskatchewan

Harvesting is complete in the region and overall the harvest season was very good as the weather was favorable and there were no major delays. Early season moisture coupled with timely rains resulted in good yields and quality. Growers are busy applying fall fertilizers because they have adequate soil moisture, unlike central and southern regions.

Crop yields have been very good in the region with all crops estimated to yield above average, some growers say it was the perfect year on their farm which is a real positive after a season also terrible in 2021. Crop quality in the region remains strong as well, with all crops largely graded in the top two tiers, there have been some minor downgrades due to ergot and other grain diseases .

Soil moisture conditions in the region have not reached desperate levels like in most of the province, but growers would still appreciate some rain before winter. Cropland topsoil moisture is rated as adequate at 59%, short at 32%, and very short at 9%. Hay and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as adequate at 43%, short at 43%, and very short at 15%.

Due to increased rainfall, hay yields have greatly improved this season and producers have not had to worry about sourcing off-farm feed. Average dryland hay yields are reported (in tons per acre) as follows: alfalfa 2; alfalfa/brome 1.8; other tame hay 1.5; wild hay 1.3 and green fodder 3.5. At present, most livestock producers have indicated that they will have enough surplus hay, straw, green fodder and feed grains before winter, with only a few producers expecting a slight shortage. supply of animal feed.

Although soil moisture is not completely depleted, winter grain area is expected to decline further in the region. Winter wheat acreage is estimated to have declined by 19%, while fall rye acreage has fallen by 25%.

Farmers are busy harrowing, tilling the fields, transporting grain, applying fertilizers and clearing the fields.

Northwest Saskatchewan

Growers have completed their harvesting operations and overall they report that it was a very good year. Early season moisture gave crops a good start to growth, and timely rains allowed them to properly fill their pods and seed heads, increasing yield potential. The harvest season has been very dry, growers have been able to work on their crop quickly as they are now concentrating on other field work until the ground freezes.

Crop yields have improved significantly this year compared to 2021, with all crops estimated to yield above average. Of course, yields vary within the region, and those who didn’t get the necessary moisture throughout the growing season saw more disappointing yields, but still much better than in 2021. Quality Crop performance also improved this year, with crops generally in the top two grades, there were slight downgrading issues due to ergot in the grain or bleached grain.

The northwest region has seen more average rainfall this year, but many parts of the region have become very dry. As winter approaches, cropland topsoil moisture is rated as adequate at 13%, short at 32%, and very short at 55%. Hay and pasture topsoil moisture is rated as adequate at 10%, short at 37%, and very short at 53%.

Greater amounts of precipitation have resulted in a better hay harvest for many producers in the region, the increased precipitation has also allowed for longer grazing periods on pasture and less pressure to supplement feed. Average dryland hay yields are reported (in tons per acre) as follows: alfalfa 1.4; alfalfa/brome 1.5; other tame hay 1; wild hay 1.2 and green fodder 2. At present, most ranchers have indicated that they will have sufficient or excess supplies of hay, straw, green fodder and feed grains before winter.

Crop journalists reported that the number of acres seeded to winter wheat and fall rye are down 20% and 32% respectively due to increasingly dry soils.

Farmers are busy harrowing, applying fertilizer, hauling bales, mending fences and bringing cattle home.

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BOMB Magazine | The dark period https://www.modernartforkids.com/bomb-magazine-the-dark-period/ Thu, 20 Oct 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://www.modernartforkids.com/bomb-magazine-the-dark-period/ The first time my father really entered the white world, he was eighteen years old. At the time, he was only the second person in the family to go to college after his aunt Linda, the youngest child of his grandmother Lizzie, who, in a world where, without access to contraceptives, women gave birth for […]]]>

The first time my father really entered the white world, he was eighteen years old. At the time, he was only the second person in the family to go to college after his aunt Linda, the youngest child of his grandmother Lizzie, who, in a world where, without access to contraceptives, women gave birth for decades, was even younger than him.

With the United States barely desegregated, my father entered a white college where, along with the other black and African students, he carved out a black space for himself. So far from home for a black boy who had never been anywhere, he took his inheritance. The lessons from home he postponed. He remixed them across the diaspora and carved out a dark period of his own making. He joined the black fraternity Alpha Phi Alpha. By working together and through student protests, black and African students, brought together at dinners hosted by Lindiwe Mabuza – the South African activist who helped bring my parents together – forced Ohio University to create a black studies program. And although in my mother’s Africa the British were everywhere, it was a black continent, and colonization was so obviously the scourge of it.

Together, my parents were always doing our dark period – their version, the one where, if not our bodies, then our minds could be free. Eventually I would learn to make my own black period – black period I need, the one that could, once again, bring me home, and I would create it using the two greatest gifts I inherited from my parents: that thirst for knowledge in my womb and an obligation to the community .

A black and white sketch of a blurred person

Tyrone Geter, Summer time: light dimming, 2022, charcoal, 60 x 40 inches.

In our day-to-day life, although we were warned against white people, my parents mostly ignored the white world. It was more something that bothered me. To put it aside, they did it in a way that, by their careful design, felt to me and Jamila like an afterthought. Being raised by people who lived and were centered in darkness and art meant that my sister and I were raised in a world that reflected our image – a world where darkness was a world of possibility. Outside of our school days, we were surrounded by people who were constantly inspired.

“Inspire” comes from the Latin “inspirare”, “spirare” literally meaning “to breathe”. The breath – that process which is, by definition, a reverberation of time, biology, memory and ancestry – that thing which should be so simply, so obviously the right of the body is what, everywhere in the world , the Blacks are fighting.

As an adult now, I know how angry the white world must have made my parents, but as children, we never saw them overwhelmed by it. That, in front of their children, white supremacy could have nothing of them, not even their rage, set precedents, priorities, but most importantly, it established the fact that where we lived was what was real, and what that was real was the Dark Period. What was real was the house. What’s real is my mother – still alive in a dream – gesturing towards the front door.

I know it’s summer by the way she says “in or out,” our dogwood tree, pink and blooming, and how the biggest black ants roam the neighborhood stalking it. By the way, the Fugees are coming out of my sister’s room in the attic and Lauryn Hill’s voice is hoarse like the inside of a whiskey barrel. Ready or not, I’m coming / You can’t hide / I’ll find you / And take it easy . . . With her hair styled Moesha braids, Jamila, finally sixteen years old, sings “The Score”. Our whole family is watching Sister Act 2: Back in the habit for the millionth time, and the way Lauryn Hill stood at that piano – the whole song, keeping her voice, like God’s eye, on the sparrow.

A portrait of a black woman with various blue tints.

Tyrone Geter, When the Spirit Pushes You, 2012, water soluble oil on paper, torn paper, 20 x 16 inches.

Years later in South Carolina, there’s me, my turn at the wheel of the Sweet Sixteen, my bare feet happily rising on the bed. In The bad education of Lauryn Hill, she rang a bell that I would still recognize anywhere. In class, she asked us what we thought about black love. In the streets we happily doo-wopped, with something in Lauryn’s voice calling the ghost of James Brown’s “Black is beautiful”! In The bad education, Lauryn sang Black and proud to us once again. She sang to our Blackness like we were the prize, his loving voice dazed us. And no matter how much our white friends loved the album, there was something in it that only we could touch.

The poet Jack Gilbert writes: “Everyone forgets that Icarus also stole. This “everyone” included me. How lucky I am now, that no matter how far I may fall, my parents and ancestors gave me everything I needed to rise from the ashes. However, in a country like America, when it came to truth, it was up to me to find it.

Parul Sehgal, speaking of a different type of fall, asks in “The Deep Void of ‘Resilience'”, “Why rise from the ashes without asking why you had to burn?”

Only facts could solve this problem.

The poet in me opened the holes in American stories like a line break. Do you know what I found? “Black Abundance” by Kiese Laymon. Kujichagulia’s “self-determination”.

The dark period was calling me home. But first, I have to remember the blackest art.

The art of escape.

Colored drawing of a black woman with a blue and green hat and a yellow top with a red dress made of pieces.

Tyrone Geter, My beauty is not my beast, 2016-2017, mixed media: torn paper and pastels, 48 ​​x 96 inches.

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