Modern art – Modern Art For Kids http://www.modernartforkids.com/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 12:44:56 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://www.modernartforkids.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/icon-6.png Modern art – Modern Art For Kids http://www.modernartforkids.com/ 32 32 Abu Dhabi’s Etihad Modern Art Gallery presents famous Hungarian art in a new exhibition https://www.modernartforkids.com/abu-dhabis-etihad-modern-art-gallery-presents-famous-hungarian-art-in-a-new-exhibition/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 12:44:56 +0000 https://www.modernartforkids.com/abu-dhabis-etihad-modern-art-gallery-presents-famous-hungarian-art-in-a-new-exhibition/ The exhibition will run until December 4, 2022 and features a selection of contemporary artworks from the collection of Hungary’s central bank, the Magyar Nemzeti Bank (MNB). These pieces examine the connection between writing and image in contemporary Hungarian painting, titled Pictography: Calligraphies, Signs, Gestures, and Letter Images. The exhibition also features 12 prominent Hungarian […]]]>

The exhibition will run until December 4, 2022 and features a selection of contemporary artworks from the collection of Hungary’s central bank, the Magyar Nemzeti Bank (MNB). These pieces examine the connection between writing and image in contemporary Hungarian painting, titled Pictography: Calligraphies, Signs, Gestures, and Letter Images.

The exhibition also features 12 prominent Hungarian artists who are well known and recognized on the Hungarian and international art scene. Many of them are leading figures of the Hungarian neo-avant-garde of the 1960s and 1970s, and others associated with the surrealist calligraphic paintings of Simon Hantaï, an artist whose work has been exhibited at Louvre Abu-Dhabi.

The works in the exhibition are based on the abstract tendencies of modern art, the different writing traditions of the great cultures and the need to express a feeling of being. Their pictorial values ​​link the personal and the universal, as well as new ways of creating spatiality, and the reconquest of spirituality from archaic writing.

Underlining the importance of calligraphy for Islamic culture, and in light of its value not only as a work of art but also as a source of inspiration, Anna Bagyó, advisor to MNB Arts and Culture and project coordinator, suggested writing as a potential theme. for the exhibition.

The theme of the exhibition is extended by a selection of award-winning Hungarian animated films, most of which have screened at prestigious international festivals.

The films will be presented in two sections, with 14 films for children and 32 films for adults.

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Nasser Al Yousif – The blind Bahraini artist who pioneered modern art in the Arab world https://www.modernartforkids.com/nasser-al-yousif-the-blind-bahraini-artist-who-pioneered-modern-art-in-the-arab-world/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 18:42:12 +0000 https://www.modernartforkids.com/nasser-al-yousif-the-blind-bahraini-artist-who-pioneered-modern-art-in-the-arab-world/ Recognized as one of the leading artists of his time, Nasser Al Yousif (d. 2006) was known for his impressive artistic expressions of Bahraini life, culture, architecture and landscapes. With over forty years of experience in the field, Al Yousif eventually lost his sight, but that didn’t stop him from pursuing his passion. In his […]]]>

Recognized as one of the leading artists of his time, Nasser Al Yousif (d. 2006) was known for his impressive artistic expressions of Bahraini life, culture, architecture and landscapes. With over forty years of experience in the field, Al Yousif eventually lost his sight, but that didn’t stop him from pursuing his passion. In his linoleum prints, Al Yousif was always able to capture the life and landscapes of Bahrain in unique ways.

Born in 1940, Al Yousif, a native of Muharraq, was known as a passionate artist who not only pioneered modern art but also paved the way for the country’s art movement. At the time, Bahrain had very few artistic resources, which for Al Yousif was a huge advantage. Attempting to fill this void, he and his contemporaries began to introduce a more infused type of art; traditional and modern.

Al Yousif was interested in art from an early age. In his early twenties, he strolled through Bahrain’s many traditional markets, gardens and ports to capture what he believed to be the quintessential Muharraq. It seems that for Al Yousif, there was no better way to represent the splendor of his country than to draw it. With no technology at his disposal, Al Yousif relied heavily on his talent and tools to bring Bahrain to life.

Al Yousif at his peak – Image credit: Albareh Art Gallery

locate art

Al Yousif’s art reminded many who followed him of the importance of looking at and contemplate. After all, if an artist spends much of his time on a canvas expressing his perception of a landscape, it is so that viewers can appreciate the perception. Bahrain being an often overlooked country in the Persian Gulf setting, it seems that Al Yousif tried to express a confident yet ageless view of Bahrain.

Image credit: Barjeel Art Foundation

As the Persian Gulf region progresses in many ways, some believe that efforts like Al Yousif’s would provide a new impetus for genuine growth. With globalization becoming more widespread, the localization of art is becoming increasingly rare. This, according to Arie Amaya-Akkermansis ‘one of the explanations of the cultural crisis that plagues the identity of local artistic production, perhaps not in terms of galleries, collectors and exhibitions but in the meaning of local space (what is which is yours?) and appropriate it.

Triumph of Insight – Never Give Up

In the one-hour documentary film titled, Triumph of Insight, Al Yousif was interviewed about his life and works. The documentary introduces viewers that Al Yousif would not give up easily; although he lost his sight, he never lost sight of his passion. Even after losing his sight in 1994, the devoted entertainer introduces viewers that insight is far more important to artists than sight.

As part of the interview, he mentioned“I have a huge background in the fine arts, spanning over 40 years. And when I lost my sight, the feasibility I had for art remained. I can’t give up!”

Main image credit: Albareh Art Gallery & Barjeel Art Foundation


Juber Ahmed

Juber Ahmed is our digital editor and travel enthusiast with a keen interest in Islamic history and heritage. He travels with his wife to various places around the world and writes about his experiences.

Juber’s favorite quote…

“The world is a book and those who do not travel read only one page” [Saint Augustine]


Key words: al yousif, artist, british muslim, british muslim magazine, to draw, the story, Overview, Muslim, nasser al yousif, Paint, travel

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A modern art masterpiece surpasses an artist’s record at Sotheby’s auction | National https://www.modernartforkids.com/a-modern-art-masterpiece-surpasses-an-artists-record-at-sothebys-auction-national/ Tue, 15 Nov 2022 12:31:29 +0000 https://www.modernartforkids.com/a-modern-art-masterpiece-surpasses-an-artists-record-at-sothebys-auction-national/ Piet Mondrian’s epic masterpiece Composition No. II fetched $55.5 million at Sotheby’s Modern Evening Auction, surpassing the artist’s record of $50.6 million. The final sale price includes the winning bid of $48 million plus Sotheby’s buyer’s premium. Composition No. II performed in the November 14 auction, which included works by Paul Gauguin, Claude Monet and […]]]>

Piet Mondrian’s epic masterpiece Composition No. II fetched $55.5 million at Sotheby’s Modern Evening Auction, surpassing the artist’s record of $50.6 million. The final sale price includes the winning bid of $48 million plus Sotheby’s buyer’s premium.

Composition No. II performed in the November 14 auction, which included works by Paul Gauguin, Claude Monet and Joan Miro. by Pablo Picasso Guitar on a tablefinalist of the auction, recovered the tidy sum of 37.1 million dollars.

Sotheby’s October press release announced the sale, providing additional insight into Mondrian’s work and legacy.

Composition No. II Meaning

Composition No. II illustrates the bold use of primary colors and striking geometry that propelled Mondrian to fame. The massive 20 by 20 foot oil on canvas features a large red square in the upper right corner, blocked by bold black lines and white rectangles. Blue and yellow corners add a splash of color to the piece, keeping the viewer’s eye engaged.

Mondrian completed Composition No. II in 1930, one of nearly thirty works. It last sold for 2.2 million at auction in 1983, a record for abstract art that has since been greatly surpassed, notably by Willem De Kooning’s Interchange, which sold for $300 million in 2015.

Julian Dawes, Sotheby’s Head of Impressionist and Modern Art for the Americas, highlighted the importance of the work. “Composition No II embodies everything one would expect of a Mondrian – it is a seminal painting both crucial to the development of modern art and emblematic of the lasting appeal of modern aesthetics.

Dawes goes on to explain that the work is “characterised by a serene sense of compositional balance and spatial order, and with superb provenance”.

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Composition No. II is part of a series of nearly thirty pieces that Mondrian completed in the 1920s and early 1930s. Art lovers in the United States can view works from the series in New York, Chicago, and San Francisco . The Met 5th ave Composition houses, an earlier work similar to Composition No. II in shape and color.

The Art Institute of Chicago features the diamond-shaped diamond composition with yellow, black, blue, red and gray, and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art highlights the rectangle Composition No. III.

Additional works in the series are exhibited in museums around the world, including the Ludwig Museum in Cologne and the Galleria Nazionale d’Arte Moderna e Contemporanea in Rome. Many others remain in private collections.

The work and legacy of Piet Mondrian

Although renowned for his geometric paintings like Composition No. II, Mondrian was a prolific painter with an extensive body of work. The Dutch artist began his career at the turn of the 20th century, when post-impressionism was the dominant form. His early works feature a style reminiscent of Paul Gauguin, with bold dark lines and a striking use of value.

Composition No. II is a perfect example of Mondrian’s enduring legacy. Despite his classical training, Mondrian turned to the exploration of geometric abstraction and stood at the forefront of the modern art movement. His work gave rise to the complete abstraction adopted by painters of the 1950s and 1960s by changing the rules of contemporary art.

Geometric patterns and simple yet striking colors have influenced artists for generations. pop artist by Roy Lichtenstein the bold use of line and color recalls Mondrian’s palette. In contrast, Chinese artist Liu Ye the squares and rectangles are an obvious homage to the geometric works of Mondrian.

Mondrian’s works influenced the minimalist movement in addition to the modern art movement. The simple aesthetic of black lines and a simple, bold color palette have inspired work in a variety of fields including fashion, design and architecture.

According to Sotheby’s, the Eames House in California, Danilo Solverstrin’s furniture, Nike’s SB Dunk shoes, and White Stripe’s De Stijl album cover are all influenced by Mondrian’s work.

While reflecting on his artistic evolution and the use of simple, primary colors in place of a natural color palette, Mondrian explained that his “work unconsciously began to deviate more and more from the natural aspects of reality… The first thing to change in my painting was the color. I gave up natural color for pure color.”

The most expensive paintings ever sold

Although the auction set records for Mondrian’s work, the sale price pales in comparison to World record. Leonardo DeVinci Salvator Mundi sold for over $475 million at a Christie’s auction in 2017, earning it the distinction of being the most expensive painting ever sold. Willem De Kooning, Paul Cézanne, Paul Gaugin, Jackson Pollack and Mark Rothko are other artists whose works have sold over 100 million.

Although Mondrian’s paintings may never sell for more than a hundred million dollars, his lasting impact on art and culture is undeniable. Its heritage shines wherever you find minimalist yet bold color patterns. The modern art movement would not have been the same without his massive influence.

More articles from the Wealth of Geeks Network:

This article was produced by Partners on fire and syndicated by Geek Wealth.

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“Inspirational encounters: women artists and the legacies of modern art” | Visual Arts | Hudson Valley https://www.modernartforkids.com/inspirational-encounters-women-artists-and-the-legacies-of-modern-art-visual-arts-hudson-valley/ Tue, 01 Nov 2022 05:21:39 +0000 https://www.modernartforkids.com/inspirational-encounters-women-artists-and-the-legacies-of-modern-art-visual-arts-hudson-valley/ Click to enlarge Photo by Frederick Charles Exterior shot of the David Rockefeller Creative Arts Center after renovation The David Rockefeller Center for the Creative Artswhich opened its doors in October on the grounds of Pocantico Center in the Westchester hamlet of Pocantico Hills, is a significant new addition to the Hudson Valley art scene. […]]]>
Click to enlarge

  • Photo by Frederick Charles
  • Exterior shot of the David Rockefeller Creative Arts Center after renovation

The David Rockefeller Center for the Creative Artswhich opened its doors in October on the grounds of Pocantico Center in the Westchester hamlet of Pocantico Hills, is a significant new addition to the Hudson Valley art scene. The center will allow the Rockefeller family to leverage their collection of modern art and longstanding support of the arts in general to provide exhibitions and events that are accessible to all sectors of our region, including underserved communities. . According to notes written by David Rockefeller, Jr. and handed out to visitors at the center’s preview, it “will host rehearsals, performances, exhibitions, artist residencies and community groups as well as a robust series of related public programs”.

An example is the centre’s first exhibition, “Inspirational Encounters: Women Artists and the Legacies of Modern Art“, which brings together works by women artists from the Rockefeller collections, such as Lee Bontecou and Louise Nevelson, in dialogue with a group of seven women artists, including Sonya Clark and Elana Herzog, who still walk in an art world too often dominated by men.

Click to enlarge Installation view of "Inspired Encounters," courtesy of the David Rockefeller Creative Arts Center.

  • Installation view of “Inspired Encounters”, courtesy of the David Rockefeller Creative Arts Center.
Click to enlarge Installation view of "Inspired Encounters," courtesy of the David Rockefeller Creative Arts Center.

  • Installation view of “Inspired Encounters”, courtesy of the David Rockefeller Creative Arts Center.

Another example is a two-month studio residency that comes with a $25,000 prize. The first winner is a Peekskill-based artist Athena La Tocha. The prize will be awarded annually, alternating between local and national artists. Importantly, an additional prize of $25,000 and a six-month residency will be awarded to a local arts organization; this year it goes to Arts 10566, also based in Peekskill, whose goal is to “meet the varied interests and needs of Peekskill’s diverse youth community through the arts”.

“We’re looking at the whole Hudson Valley,” says Elly Weisenberg Kelly, manager of public programs at the Pocantico Center. “We want to be part of this whole cultural ecosystem – the name of the game here is to be accessible.” Tickets for most events cost between $15 and $30. Through its ties to community groups, the center provides free transportation as well as free tickets to events when needed. The new gallery is free for all visitors.

Click to enlarge Fluted Head, Elizabeth Catlett, Bronze, 12 1/2" x9" x9", 1991. - National Academy of Design, New York.  © 2022 Mora-Catlett Family / Licensed by VAGA to Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

  • Fluted Head, Elizabeth Catlett, Bronze, 12 1/2″ x 9″ x 9″, 1991. National Academy of Design, New York. © 2022 Mora-Catlett Family / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

The center’s performance facility is the Bloomberg Philanthropies Performance Space, a 180-seat indoor theater with cushioned bleacher seats that can be telescoped out to provide additional floor space. Pivoting doors provide access to an adjacent exterior patio creating an indoor/outdoor playhouse. Upcoming programs include “Untold Tales”, a multidisciplinary production by Pablo and Anna Mayor of Folklore Urbano NYC on November 16 with music, dance and theater inspired by the stories of immigrants living in the greater New York area. A performance incorporating music, text, video and visual art by Kyle Abraham’s award-winning dance company AIM will take place on December 1.

The building itself is a work of art, a prime example of adaptive reuse. Originally designed by William Wells Bosworth in 1908 as an orangery for John D. Rockefeller and now restored and updated by FX Collaborative, it retains the elegance of its original exterior as well as the high ceilings supported by columns close to its historic interior. The overall look as well as the versatile functionality of the space is definitely 21st century – the building’s electrical needs are met entirely by solar panels installed on site. The installation uses state-of-the-art audio and lighting equipment. It also uses abundant natural lighting through large windows and skylights that can be covered with sunshades or blackout blinds.

Click to enlarge The David Rockefeller Arts Center before restoration.  - PHOTO BY FREDERIC CHARLES

  • Photo by Frederick Charles
  • The David Rockefeller Arts Center before restoration.

The The “Inspired Encounters” exhibition on view through March 19 features works not only by Bontecou and Nevelson, but also other luminaries such as Marisol Escobar, Anni Albers and Grace Hartigan from Nelson A. Rockefeller’s extensive collection, in visual conversation with works recently commissioned by seven other women artists. Joining Sonya Clark and Elana Herzog are Maren Hassinger, Melissa Meyer, Fanny Sanin, Barbara Takenaga and Kay WalkingStick. The exhibition was co-curated by Katrina London, Head of Collections and Curatorial Projects at the Pocantico Center, and Jeremiah William McCarthy, Chief Curator of the Westmoreland Museum of American Art.

Highlights of the artistic dialogues on display include Takenaga’s large painting on six hollow wooden doors, Two for Bontecouwho cites Bontecou’s dark, gritty work in canvas, metal, and wire: Untitled,1960. Another is an autobiographical suite of nine prints by Anni Albers, Connections, 1925–83, paired with a small sculpture fashioned by Louise Nevelson with Plexiglas and gilt machine screws. (The Albers suite is on loan from the Johnson Collection; Rockefeller’s collection includes an Albers, but the curators wanted to give it a greater presence in the exhibit.) Kay WalkingStick poses the perhaps rhetorical question “Whose countryside ? in his two Hudson River School-style works, homages to Cole and Durand, subtly emblazoned with Native American motifs.

Click to enlarge "Thom, Where are the Pocumtucks (The Oxbow)," Kay WalkingStick, oil on panel, 24" x48", 2020. Courtesy of the artist and Hales Gallery, London and New York.  Photo by JSP Art Photography

  • “Thom, Where are the Pocumtucks (The Oxbow)”, Kay WalkingStick, oil on panel, 24″ x 48″, 2020. Courtesy of the artist and Hales Gallery, London and New York. Photo by JSP Art Photography

There is also a dialogue about the complexities of reason and emotion between the paintings of Melissa Meyer and Grace Hartigan. by Meyer A nod to grace featuring both poised and playful painterly calligraphy is next to Hartigan’s lovely Salome, between abstraction and representation, between body and mind, and deep within the emotional poetry of gesture and color. London notes that in the Rockefeller’s Kykuit mansion, the piece “was in a service tunnel on the ground floor which was turned into a gallery where it was difficult to grasp the work”. It is now visible to everyone.

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Works inspired by PM Modi inaugurated at the National Gallery of Modern Art https://www.modernartforkids.com/works-inspired-by-pm-modi-inaugurated-at-the-national-gallery-of-modern-art/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 15:48:00 +0000 https://www.modernartforkids.com/works-inspired-by-pm-modi-inaugurated-at-the-national-gallery-of-modern-art/ An exhibition of artworks inspired by Prime Minister Narendra Modi was opened by Union Culture Minister G Kishan Reddy on Friday. The exhibition of paintings by eminent artist Akbar Saheb has opened at the National Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi. “Akbar Saheb’s art is unique as the 55 works are entirely inspired by Prime […]]]>

An exhibition of artworks inspired by Prime Minister Narendra Modi was opened by Union Culture Minister G Kishan Reddy on Friday.

The exhibition of paintings by eminent artist Akbar Saheb has opened at the National Gallery of Modern Art, New Delhi. “Akbar Saheb’s art is unique as the 55 works are entirely inspired by Prime Minister Narendra Modi and his incredible journey and vision. November 2022,” the Ministry of Culture said in a statement.

Reddy, also the Union Minister for Tourism and Development of the North East Region, said Akbar Saheb showed Gujarat’s prime minister’s journey to become the world leader.

He added that the paintings show major political decisions such as the GST and clearly depict demonetization and the surgical strike. The Minister also said the paintings showed the challenges facing the Prime Minister.

“The themes presented promise to resonate with every Indian across the country. Each work is deeply rooted in the initiatives taken by the Union Government and is directly linked to the aspirations of the common man and the progress of the nation.

“The paintings also highlight the achievements of Prime Minister Narendra Modi as well as the many challenges faced by various projects such as Vibrant Gujarat, Shining Bright (based on Asia’s largest solar park in Gujarat), Statue of Unity, Truth Prevails, Sadhbhavana Yatra and so on.

“Some notable paintings are Lasting Impact” which depicts the tremendous power of resilience and endurance of sound (PM). Bharat Mata “is another evocative work where the prime minister’s mother is personified as Bharat Mata,” the statement said.

Over forty works of art are beautiful expressions based on the popular lecture series, Mann ki Baat. Works like Sankalp Se Siddhi, Say NO to Black Money, Beware of Drugs, Save our Farmers, Water is a Blessing and Helping Hands are masterful compositions that not only look good but also send a powerful message of humanity and compassion.

“Akbar Saheb’s paintings present a narrative of mass mobilization and the positive impact of programs like Swachh Bharat, Digital India, Mudra Yojana, Yoga as part of life, village electrification and LPG connections for They also illustrate the revitalization of the economy with the ambitious Make in India project and the growth of tourism as a showcase of the country’s cultural heritage,” the statement said.

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How Horror Changed Modern Art https://www.modernartforkids.com/how-horror-changed-modern-art/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 13:54:29 +0000 https://www.modernartforkids.com/how-horror-changed-modern-art/ The Horror Show! Courtesy of Barnbrook; Somerset House To enter “The Horror Show!” from Somerset House, visitors must walk past the giant tines on the quayside of the Thames that lead to the basement galleries, and through a pitch-black hallway where the 1982 Bauhaus single “Bela Lugosi’s Dead” plays. But anyone expecting the ersatz Halloween […]]]>

To enter “The Horror Show!” from Somerset House, visitors must walk past the giant tines on the quayside of the Thames that lead to the basement galleries, and through a pitch-black hallway where the 1982 Bauhaus single “Bela Lugosi’s Dead” plays. But anyone expecting the ersatz Halloween phantasmagoria would be disappointed. Instead, this exhibition, curated by Claire Catterall and artists Iain Forsyth and Jane Pollard, traces and celebrates Britain’s counter-cultural reactions to the turbulent politics and anxieties of the past 40 years.

For starters, it’s refreshing to come across an exhibit that doesn’t see the 1960s as a national high point. Instead, it’s largely about what emerged from the long hangover of this decade’s failed ideals, both politically and creatively. Overlooking it all is Margaret Thatcher – literally in the first room, where his grotesque Spitting image the puppet stares at Judy Blame’s crown helmet, but also at how much of what we still live in today has been shaped by the political and social upheaval it sparked.

The three sections of the exhibition, Monster, Ghost and Witch, are loosely chronological, dealing respectively with the turmoil of the late 70s and early 80s, the upheavals of the turn of the millennium and the crash of 2008 to the present. . But this is not a didactic tour of political art. Artists appear in more than one era, the dates of their work not always being in the “right” period, giving the sense of a culture in dialogue with itself. Music, performance, fashion, clubbing, film, sound, text and cultural ephemera swirl with thrilling energy.

The Bromley Contingent, 1978. Photo by Ray Stevenson

Thatcher is not the only specter that haunts the art of these periods. The AIDS crisis figures prominently, via Leigh Bowery’s empty suit and a club-like space echoing to the sound of Soft Cell’s “Memorabilia,” while images and images of 1980s queer nightlife and from the early 1990s are projected onto the walls. 76 minute film by Derek Jarman Bluehis last meditation on art and illness, is shown in its entirety on a loop in its own room, retaining all its visionary power and quiet anger almost 30 years after the filmmaker’s death.

A second haunting comes in the form of the very stuff our cities are made of. In the Ghost section, a wall of images of Rachel Whiteread’s 1993 sculpture Accommodation (a concrete cast of a three-story house) next to Cornelia Parker’s A meteorite lands on the Millennium Dome comments on the enormous changes to the British built environment over the past three decades, as the urban becomes increasingly identikit. I was struck watching Laura Kuenssberg’s disastrous interview of Liz Truss at the Conservative Party Conference this month by how generic the backdrop outside the studio was – glass buildings and of dreary signs, chain restaurants. It was Birmingham, but it could have been anywhere. The corporate homogeneity of contemporary cities is a physical and psychic barrier to the creativity celebrated in this exhibition – the real horror of modern Britain is often frighteningly bland.

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These concerns are reflected in the new work of Laura Grace Ford An unobscured aura, a room lined with photocopied images of underground passages, abandoned edges and towers. Ford’s work comments on class and identities under threat amid rapid gentrification, and in his voiceover architecture becomes animalistic, London disappearing under a ‘swarm of towers’. She collaborated with Stephen Mallinder, who, as part of Cabaret Voltaire, captured the sounds of Sheffield’s industrial decline. Like many in this exhibition, it brings together the post-punk era and the present.

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A dream in green, 2015. Photo by Juno Calypso. Courtesy of the artist

The latest Witch collection – supposedly the most contemporary and relevant to our current moment of crisis – lacks the critical bite that makes the rest of the show such a hit. There is a diaphanous artistic statement about “the new witches” “using sex, magic and technology to shape a new reality” as they “dare to dream towards an interconnected world; one who rejects the pride of rooted binaries to design a universe of multiple possibilities”. Tarot has a fashionable moment, and there are two decks on display here, but it’s a fashionable, inward-facing escape, rather than a bubbling cauldron of ideas to make a meaningful impact on the chaos that engulfs us.

Nonetheless, the work itself is visually striking, from Penny Slinger’s fusion of the erotic and the sacred, to the uncanny occultism that spans from the writings of Austin Osman Spare to the music of Coil and Cyclobe, and Serena Korda’s ceramic grotesques. Zadie Xa’s fantastic outfits for her performance Basic Instructions b4 Leaving and Col Self’s Sisterhood Rising (for Fahimeh) picking up a thread where Leigh Bowery left off in the 1980s. Descending a flight of stairs, “The Horror Show” ends with Tai Shani’s The neon hieroglyph, a giant, ghostly sculpture covered in balloons and trinkets as Gazelle Twin’s raw ambient soundtrack bleeds from speakers around the room. It is a magnificent object, both beautiful and disturbing.

A complex creative relationship with the country you come from involves both expressing your rage at its flaws and your love for it – a kind of anxious patriotism, a frustration with the way things are and the belief that they could be better. . It’s an atmosphere that runs through this exhibition, which feels of these islands, as British as The Hay Wain and Elgar – or, for that matter, well-worn countercultural iconography like the Clash or the Battle of the Beanfield. “The Horror Show” is anything but grim, nihilistic, downcast, but exudes a defiant joy, a pride in resistance, a playful celebration of what the British people are capable of when they simultaneously say “fuck you” and keep with a wide open mind.

[See also: Caroline Herschel’s celestial discoveries]

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In Equilibrium exhibition at the Heide Museum of Modern Art preview https://www.modernartforkids.com/in-equilibrium-exhibition-at-the-heide-museum-of-modern-art-preview/ Thu, 27 Oct 2022 01:00:00 +0000 https://www.modernartforkids.com/in-equilibrium-exhibition-at-the-heide-museum-of-modern-art-preview/ Normal text sizeLarger text sizeVery large text size The woman who ‘put the hole in modern sculpture’ died alone in her studio in 1975. Barbara Hepworth had battled throat cancer for several years, but it was a fire at the Trewyn Studio in the Cornish seaside town of St Ives who ended his life. The […]]]>

The woman who ‘put the hole in modern sculpture’ died alone in her studio in 1975. Barbara Hepworth had battled throat cancer for several years, but it was a fire at the Trewyn Studio in the Cornish seaside town of St Ives who ended his life. The 72-year-old artist was a chain smoker and the fire was probably started by one of the cigarettes she was enjoying in bed.

At the time of his death, Hepworth and Henry Moore were already enthroned as Britain’s greatest sculptors. In America, where she was probably best known as the creator of Single forma monumental bronze installed in the United Nations Plaza in New York, it was greeted by a New York Times obituary as “one of the greatest sculptors in the world”. The article recounted his description of the sculpture as “a three-dimensional projection of primitive feeling: touch, texture, size and scale, hardness and warmth, evocation and compulsion to move, live and love”.

Hepworth’s position in Australia, a place she never visited but where her work influenced a generation of mid-century artists, is more low-key. Examples of his art are held in several state gallery collections – polished bronze Head (Ra) is a popular exhibition at the Art Gallery of South Australia, for example – but there has never been a major Australian survey. So far, that is. Barbara Hepworth: in balancean exhibition of over 40 works, opens at the Heide Museum of Modern Art on 5 November.

“Hepworth’s influence on Australian sculpture has been widespread, but not well studied,” says Kendrah Morgan, co-curator of In balance. “Her work connects to really elemental ideas about people, landscape and the universe, and she’s a great example of an artist synthesizing big themes into accessible forms.”

Barbara Hepworth with the cast of Curved Form (Bryher II) at the Palais de Danse, 1961.Credit:Studio St Ives, © Bowness

The show features many sensual ovoid shapes that she has carved out of wood and stone in her studio in St Ives. Figure (1933) is an early example of his “breakthrough” work, says Heide’s artistic director and co-curator of In balance, Lesley Harding. “She explored the idea that a void or an absence could be filled with meaning.”

Spring (1966), which is a favorite of Harding and Morgan, collects all his ideas in a superb bronze. “He has everything,” Harding says. “The ovoid shape, the color, the piercing and the strings [pieces of cord threaded across the sculpture’s aperture like a harp] which were so important for his intervening period.

The appreciation of the co-curators for the modernist sculptor is profound, especially since the realization of Barbara Hepworth: in balance was far from simple. The pair began working on the show in 2018 with visits to Hepworth’s childhood home in Yorkshire, the studio in St Ives and the rugged Cornish coast that inspired much of their work. They negotiated loans against competition from a major UK show and hung on when COVID hit. Much to their delight, many institutions in Britain, Australia and New Zealand have honored their pledges to loan work despite the decision to move the show from 2021 to 2022.

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Heide is the obvious place to hold a Hepworth inquiry, they argue. “She was a contemporary of Heide founders John and Sunday Reed, and they would have known of her work,” says Morgan. “They were interested in the same kind of politics and they read the same kind of books. There is a nice parallel stream.

Hepworth’s personal life suggests that she also shared the Reeds’ disdain for social convention. She met her first husband, sculptor John Skeaping, in Rome and was still married to him when she began an affair with abstract painter Ben Nicholson in 1931. The affair produced triplets three years later.

As Nicholson shuttled between life with Hepworth in London and his wife and three children in Paris, Hepworth felt trapped in a basement flat with three newborn babies and his four-year-old son. Skeaping. “I was scared for the first time in my life,” she wrote.

Clockwise from main: Mother and Child, 1934;  the triplets in 1937;  Three magic stones, 1973.

Clockwise from main: Mother and Child, 1934; the triplets in 1937; Three magic stones, 1973.

Desperate to continue making art, she made the difficult decision to allow her babies to be kept in a kindergarten. The episode was interpreted as the work of a coldly ambitious woman who chose art over motherhood. But letters published in 2020 reveal both her deep love for infants and the agony she suffered debating whether to let others care for them. She had contact with them later in life and her works often reflect the significance of the number three. Critics have speculated that works such as those from 1973 Group of three magic stoneswhich will be presented at Heide, are a direct reference to triplets.

Harding recognizes the need for an exhibition to strike a balance between the artist’s story and his work. “You can’t talk about art without talking about the life of the artist,” she says. But it’s also true that female artists have been defined by their relationships to a much greater extent than their male counterparts.

Barbara Hepworth in Trewyn Studio, October 1949.

Barbara Hepworth in Trewyn Studio, October 1949.Credit:Studio St Ives, © Bowness

Which brings us to Henry Moore. The tendency to compare and contrast Hepworth to a man she first met when she was a student at Leeds School of Art, began during her lifetime and did her some favors. They mixed in the same artistic circles and vacationed together in Norfolk with mutual friends. But as their stars rose, comparisons between their works were often detrimental to him. When Hepworth represented Britain at the Venice Biennale in 1950 – two years after Moore – some commentators took her for his pupil. In fact, Hepworth “bore” his first work in 1931; Moore followed suit 12 months later. Yet it was Moore, a staunch and vocal supporter of his own work, who declared 1932 “the year of the hole”.

Hepworth, happily based in St Ives, was sometimes seen as a provincial artist, while Moore was a global art star with strong connections to the art establishment. In 2018 it was revealed that he had actively undermined Hepworth when the Tate Gallery board considered buying one of his wooden works. Moore, a Tate administrator at the time, wrote: “If the sculpture [was] anything more than that would be bad business. His intervention was effective and the purchase was abandoned.

Barbara Hepworth, Two Figures (Menhirs), 1964 (left) and Figure, 1933.

Barbara Hepworth, Two Figures (Menhirs), 1964 (left) and Figure, 1933. Credit:

Art historian Dr Sophie Bowness, who is Hepworth’s granddaughter, agrees the incident happened at a time when her grandmother was short on money and therefore ‘had a real impact’ . “It doesn’t paint a good picture of Henry,” she says.

Hepworth sometimes felt unsupported by key institutions such as the Tate Gallery and the British Council, Bowness says. “Both favored Moore to a degree that we can now view as unbalanced and unfair,” she says. “But Hepworth and Moore are very different artists, and the constant and indiscriminate coupling of her with Moore, or the presentation of her as an epigone of Moore, in the past and to some extent still today, is very tedious and inaccurate.

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Better, then, to recognize Hepworth’s colorful milieu from afar, but celebrate his art for its own sake. It’s not difficult, says Harding. “I love art that moves me; I like having a relationship with him. I think people who think they don’t like abstract work will be pleasantly surprised to find a truly human dimension to it.

Barbara Hepworth: in balance is at the Heide Museum of Modern Art, from November 5 to March 13.

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Fort Worth’s Museum of Modern Art pays tribute to its greatest patron with an exhibition of groundbreaking artists https://www.modernartforkids.com/fort-worths-museum-of-modern-art-pays-tribute-to-its-greatest-patron-with-an-exhibition-of-groundbreaking-artists/ Mon, 24 Oct 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://www.modernartforkids.com/fort-worths-museum-of-modern-art-pays-tribute-to-its-greatest-patron-with-an-exhibition-of-groundbreaking-artists/ Mark Rothko, Jackson Pollock, Francis Bacon, Cindy Sherman, Anselm Kiefer: it’s a list of revolutionary modern artists, and they represent a tumult of different styles and formats: minimalism, abstract expressionism, photography, painting, collage. Yet they are all in the same exhibit at the Museum of Modern Art in Fort Worth, some 80 works by 47 […]]]>

Mark Rothko, Jackson Pollock, Francis Bacon, Cindy Sherman, Anselm Kiefer: it’s a list of revolutionary modern artists, and they represent a tumult of different styles and formats: minimalism, abstract expressionism, photography, painting, collage.

Yet they are all in the same exhibit at the Museum of Modern Art in Fort Worth, some 80 works by 47 artists. It is proof that Anne Windfohr Marion – with the help of former senior curator Michael Auping – had a considerable interest in modern art of all kinds, the money to buy it and an eye for the exceptional.

Auping retired to California, but returned to Fort Worth to put on the new show, “Modern Masters: A Tribute to Anne Windfohr Marion.” Standing in the first gallery, he pointed to three major paintings on the walls: Francis Bacon’s first self-portrait (from 1956), “White Band, No. 27” by Mark Rothko (1954), and “Two Women” by Willem de Kooning ( 1954). -55).

Collectively, he said, in today’s market, only those three would go up for auction for somewhere near half a billion dollars.

Highest price for a Mark Rothko: $87 million.
Highest price for a Francis Bacon: $142 million.
Highest price for a Willem de Kooning: $300 million.

Michael Auping, former senior curator at the Museum of Modern Art in Fort Worth, discusses Willem deKooning’s “Two Women”

This speaks to the madness of the art market over the past decade. But it is also proof of good judgment and good taste. Auping recalled that the museum bought the Bacon for $5 million twenty years ago – from a $10 million fund that Marion had arranged so the museum could build up its collection before moving to its new home, designed by Pritzker Prize winner Tadao Ando.

Windfohr, who died in 2020 at 81, inherited four West Texas ranches from her grandfather – the Burnett Ranches, including the legendary 6666 Ranch in King County. Her stepfather was Charles Tandy, founder of the Tandy Corporation. And she formed her own oil company, Burnett Oil – eventually becoming a billionaire.

Auping said Marion may well have gotten her fascination with art from her mother (“Big Anne”), who collected native Indian blankets and notable ceramics. Marion also studied art history at the University of Geneva in Switzerland.

“A lot of collectors today,” Auping said, “they can talk about quality, but what they really care about is, ‘Give me something big, give me something punchy, something that people are going to talk about right away. ” “

By contrast, Marion’s tastes may have been wide-ranging, Auping said, but “her main focus was quality” and she didn’t care to identify with any particular school or movement. Or what the immediate impact might be.

Museum of Modern Art architect Tadao Ando with Ann Marion and John Marion

Museum of Modern Art architect Tadao Ando with Ann Marion and John Marion

“It sounds like a cliché,” Auping said, “but she also loved the art she could live with. I always think of [her taste] like an eclectic elegance.”

Marion was involved in the process of creating the new museum building — she approved the selection of architect Tadao Ando, ​​who was designing his first major project in America. Additionally, several works of art in Modern’s collection are officially from the Burnett Foundation. Marion was president and administrator of the foundation, so these donations also came from her.

When asked how often a patron like Marion comes, Auping said he thought, once every ten years? No. Once in twenty? During his career, he visited four museums. She was, he said, a one-of-a-kind artistic patron.

“Modern Masters: A Tribute to Ann Windfohr Marion” takes place at Fort Worth Museum of Modern Art until January 8.

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‘Animal Modernities’ addresses issues of animal action in modern art https://www.modernartforkids.com/animal-modernities-addresses-issues-of-animal-action-in-modern-art/ Fri, 21 Oct 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://www.modernartforkids.com/animal-modernities-addresses-issues-of-animal-action-in-modern-art/ The symposium brought together scholars to discuss depictions of animals in 18th and 19th century art. by Sophie Marie Chadha | 10/21/22 02:00 The ‘Animal Modernities’ symposium brought together professors from around the world to discuss an extraordinary range of topics related to how depictions of animals in 18th and 19th century art reveal the […]]]>

The symposium brought together scholars to discuss depictions of animals in 18th and 19th century art.

by Sophie Marie Chadha
| 10/21/22 02:00

The ‘Animal Modernities’ symposium brought together professors from around the world to discuss an extraordinary range of topics related to how depictions of animals in 18th and 19th century art reveal the changing relationships between humans and animals. animals over time. The symposium, which took place on October 13, was organized by the Leslie Center for the Arts and Humanities and the Art History, French and Italian departments of the Hopkins Center for the Arts.

“We try to move away from iconography and see animals as co-creators, with a more active role in art history than simply as an inert subject for brilliant artists to discover and represent”, said Dartmouth, assistant professor of art history and co. -organizer Katie Hornstein wrote.

The symposium was co-organized by Daniel Harkett, professor at Hornstein and Colby College. While collaborating on a research project on animal agency in art, Hornstein and Harkett came up with the idea for the conference. The couple appealed to scholars, colleagues and mailing lists “to challenge the traditional submission of ‘nonhuman animals’ in narratives of the emergence of modern visual culture between 1750 and 1900,” according to the department’s website. of English. Due to the flood of interest in the presentation, they had a rigorous acceptance process that helped them cultivate a selection of “really high-caliber presentations,” which Hornstein said she and Harkett were “really thrilled with. “.

Annie Ronan, an assistant professor of art history at Virginia Tech University, one of the speakers at the conference, said she got involved in the underrepresented field of animal modernities completely by accident.

“My friends would often send me paintings of dogs dressed in human costumes and similarly ridiculous images because they thought I would find them funny as an art historian,” Ronan said.

Although they made her laugh, these strange depictions of animals in 19th century paintings piqued her interest beyond mere comedy. When she came across “That’s very weird, isn’t it?” – an 1885 oil painting by James Henry Beard which depicts a chimpanzee seated in a chair and holding Darwin’s classic “The Descent of Man and Selection in Relation to Sex” – she said she had sent it to his adviser because she thought he would find it entertaining.

Although originally having nothing to do with her thesis, Ronan eventually told her advisor that she was actually focusing on painting – to which her advisor responded with confusion and skepticism, saying ‘you know painting is insane, right?’ He asked me. I said, ‘I know.’

Similar to Ronan, Professor Catherine Girard of St. Francis Xavier University in Montreal also found her transition into animal studies strange. Referencing the famous quote by early 20th century German art historian Erwin Panofsky that beaver constructions cannot be considered art because only humans can make art, Girard began to ponder whether or not art historians should “begin to study and interrogate the aesthetic productions of non-human species”. .”

“It’s kind of a fun question, but it’s also a deeply serious question about what differentiates human and non-human animals,” Girard said.

In his presentation, “What Do Seals Want? Destabilizing the Visual Culture of Seals and Sealing through the History of Restorative Art and Deference to Indigenous Epistemologies”, Girard explored art made with materials from seals, emphasizing the importance of repatriation and respecting the perspectives of Indigenous peoples on how their works are represented to the public. She spoke of Inuit culture as an example of how Indigenous communities often grant animals more agency and respect than Western cultures and how they maintain a looser boundary of identity between themselves and animals.

Looking back on the symposium as a whole, Girard said it resonated with the “cross-cutting idea of ​​gender” that frequently cropped up in the other presentations.

“As soon as we begin to interrogate the margin of gender identities – within the framework of the shift away from the centrality of human experience – other marginalized identities begin to come more into play. The symposium generated a discourse that would create associations between animality and different conditions of otherness,” Girard said.

Tarek El-Ariss, Professor of Middle Eastern Studies at Dartmouth, explained how the concept of modernity draws inspiration from multiple different cultures. In his speech on the plurality of modernity, he asked, “How do you make modernity include multiple cultural traditions of thought? »

El-Ariss pointed out that while “modernity” may be a Western concept, it is built on global contributions “from different sides, with different perspectives.”

“Modernity establishes itself through exclusion but also undermines itself – no longer subject to the architecture of control that modernity imagines itself to have,” he said.

Jonas Rosenthal ’25, one of the few student participants at the symposium, met El-Ariss on Arabic LSA+ in Morocco. Rosenthal said he found El-Ariss’s speech interesting and was particularly struck by this idea that the ‘Frankenstein’ monster ‘served as a symbol of the failure of modernity’, erasing the gaze omniscient and classification ability of humans.

In their humorous and thoughtful talk, “Modernism is a cat,” Michael Yonan, professor of art history at the University of California, Davis, and Amy Freund, chair of art history at Southern Methodist University, analyzed the significance of cats in 18th and 19th century paintings. Often overlooked as mere symbols of domesticity in paintings from this era, Yonan and Freund argued that cats “actually represent qualities that resonate with the artist who depicts them”.

Yonan and Freund highlighted the positioning of the cat in “The painter’s studio: a true allegory summarizing seven years of my life as an artist”, as an example. It was said then that the painter, Gustav Courbet, asserts himself as a hunter and not a “flaneur”, which is the fashionable character of a detached and observant figure that most French artists assume at this time. In their article, Yonan and Freund propose an alternative to the flâneur: that, like cats in their hunter mentality, “artists rather pounce on reality, and even kill it”.

The “Modernism is a Cat” speakers drew a lot of laughs as they ended with an acknowledgment of their own cats’ contribution to this article. Yonan and Freund said the presence of cats while their owners worked informed the professors’ research, because cats train you to do what they want and look at them in specific ways. Returning to one of the central questions of the symposium, Yonan and Freund said they fully support the idea that animals have power over how we portray them in art.

Hornstein said the symposium’s guiding question of the human-animal relationship in art history is particularly pressing given what she described as the age of human-made environmental catastrophe we now live in.

“What would it mean to somehow destabilize this arrogant and powerful conception of the human?” said Hornstein. “One answer we have to this is to look at the spaces in art history where the conception of the human is established, and see how the animal could somehow disrupt, destabilize [or] difficulty.”

The second part of this symposium, which will take place at Colby College on April 13, will focus lightly on the collection workshop of papers presented at the Dartmouth symposium and on working out the main threads connecting the wide range of topics to summarize in a book. or anthology.

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The Museum of Modern Art breathes new life into paintings from the 1960s-90s [PHOTO] https://www.modernartforkids.com/the-museum-of-modern-art-breathes-new-life-into-paintings-from-the-1960s-90s-photo/ Tue, 18 Oct 2022 11:11:00 +0000 https://www.modernartforkids.com/the-museum-of-modern-art-breathes-new-life-into-paintings-from-the-1960s-90s-photo/ By Laman Ismayilova The Azerbaijani Museum of Modern Arts has breathed new life into paintings from the 1960s-90s, reports Azernews. The exhibition, titled “Second Wind”, immediately caught the attention of art lovers. This unique art project was jointly organized by the Ministry of Culture, the public association Cultural Network House (CNH) and the Baku Museum […]]]>

By Laman Ismayilova

The Azerbaijani Museum of Modern Arts has breathed new life into paintings from the 1960s-90s, reports Azernews.

The exhibition, titled “Second Wind”, immediately caught the attention of art lovers.

This unique art project was jointly organized by the Ministry of Culture, the public association Cultural Network House (CNH) and the Baku Museum of Modern Art.

Renowned cultural and artistic personalities, representatives of the diplomatic corps and other guests attended the opening ceremony of the exhibition.

Speaking at the event, Culture Minister Anar Karimov highlighted the importance of the exhibition for Azerbaijani art.

“The fund of the State Art Gallery of Azerbaijan contains more than 10,000 works of painting, graphics and sculpture, decorative and contemporary art by Azerbaijani artists. The presentation of these paintings to the general public clearly testifies to the glorious history of Azerbaijani art,” the minister said.

Anar Karimov pointed out that all exhibited works of art are considered valuable works of art which are included in the fund of the State Art Gallery of Azerbaijan.

He pointed out that the State Art Gallery of Azerbaijan was created thanks to the attention and care of a great patron of Azerbaijani culture and national leader Heydar Aliyev.

Stressing that the exhibition will last for a month, Anar Karimov said that it is also of great importance in terms of transmitting the rich school of painting of Azerbaijan to younger generations.

Cultural Network House president Aynur Suleymanzada said work on the project had been going on for seven months as it was being restored, thus giving it a “second wind”.

Chairman of the Union of Azerbaijani Artists, People’s Artist Farhad Khalilov called the 60s of the 20th century the “Renaissance” of Azerbaijani fine arts.

“These works of art are eternal and have great artistic value. It is gratifying to note that even today representatives of Azerbaijani fine arts make a great contribution to the development of national culture,” he said. he adds.

After the speeches, the guests were able to discover the works presented at the exhibition.

The exhibition presents 72 works of art by 41 artists from the 1960s and 1990s. Among the presented works of art from the State Art Gallery of Azerbaijan are works of art by famous artists Sattar Bahlulzada, Tahir Salahov, Togrul Narimanbayov, Salam Salamzada, Hafiz Mammadov, Mikayil Abdullayev, Baba Aliyev, Halida Safarova, Latif Feyzullayev, Elmira Shakhtakhtinskaya, Oqtay Sadixzada, and others.

The “Second vent” exhibition will last until November 6.

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