Modern art – Modern Art For Kids http://www.modernartforkids.com/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 10:01:18 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://www.modernartforkids.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/icon-6.png Modern art – Modern Art For Kids http://www.modernartforkids.com/ 32 32 Modern art and the esteem machine https://www.modernartforkids.com/modern-art-and-the-esteem-machine/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 10:01:18 +0000 https://www.modernartforkids.com/modern-art-and-the-esteem-machine/ The elimination of the modern art tariff made it much easier for American galleries to exhibit and sell contemporary European painting. Most of the works in Stieglitz’s Picasso exhibit at 291, for example, were drawings, as they were valued at a lower value than the paintings. It was too expensive to bring paintings from Europe. […]]]>

The elimination of the modern art tariff made it much easier for American galleries to exhibit and sell contemporary European painting. Most of the works in Stieglitz’s Picasso exhibit at 291, for example, were drawings, as they were valued at a lower value than the paintings. It was too expensive to bring paintings from Europe.

Quinn wasn’t collecting just for himself. He was on a mission. As Eakin puts it, he wanted to “bring American civilization to the forefront of the modern world.” So it functioned as, in effect, a one-man art world. He subsidized New York art galleries, often purchasing many of the works they exhibited. He was one of the figureheads of the 1913 Armory Show, where the public could see more than thirteen hundred works of modern art, and where Marcel Duchamp’s “Nu Descending a Staircase” became a scandalous success.

When modern art came under attack for undermining American values ​​- the Time called the Armory Show “part of the general movement, perceptible throughout the world, aimed at disrupting and degrading, if not destroying, not only art, but also literature and society” – Quinn worked in the press, giving interviews to New York newspapers in which he called unsigned attacks like this “criticism of Ku Klux.” Over time, he built up a huge collection of modern European paintings and sculptures, which he stored in his ninth-floor apartment in Central Park West.

The apartment was a rental. Quinn was rich, but he wasn’t JP Morgan rich. Morgan spent something like sixty million dollars on art, which he donated to the Metropolitan Museum of Art, of which he was president. Quinn didn’t have that kind of money. On the other hand, Morgan was buying Old Masters (he was behind the 1909 tax law exempting “historical art” which Quinn had rewritten), while Quinn was buying works that hardly anyone else did not want. From the perspective of the American art world, the incredible collection he amassed, containing works by, among others, Brâncuși, Braque, Duchamp, Gris, Matisse, Picasso, Rousseau, Seurat, van Gogh and Villon , was almost worthless. when he died. No American dealer could sell it and no American museum wanted to hang it.

Knowing this, Quinn ordered, in her will, that her collection be auctioned off, with the proceeds going to her sister and niece, who were her sole heirs. (Quinn never married, but he had affairs with a number of notable women; at the time of his death his companion was Jeanne Robert Foster, a lumberjack’s daughter, a surprisingly beautiful and gifted woman who was closely involved in his search for new art.) As the Americans did not want it, so much of Quinn’s European art collection ended up returning to Europe.

Conveniently for Eakin’s story arc, Alfred Barr, then a young art history professor at Wellesley, got to see some of Quinn’s collection before it was dispersed, allowing Eakin to suggest that one of Barr’s aspirations when he accepted the leadership of MoMA three years later was to collect the Quinn collection and bring it back to America. It was impossible, of course. The parts were now in too many hands. But MoMA became, in effect, Quinn’s museum, and Quinn’s canon (plus photography and some artists, like Klee and Kandinsky, of which Quinn did not collect) became Barr’s canon.

And it’s still MoMAit’s the cannon. If you cross the fifth floor of MoMA Today, where works of art belonging to the museum and produced between 1880 and 1940 are displayed, you will observe the very works whose adventures in the world of art are the subject of Eakin’s book.

Probably hundreds of people pass by these works every day, and none of them seem outraged, even by Picasso’s eight-foot-tall “Demoiselles d’Avignon” painted in 1907: five naked women in a brothel, rendered cubically, two with faces like African masks, aggressively confronting the viewer. (You have to stand very close to the canvas to get the right effect, although hardly anyone does.) The shock of the news has worn off. It probably wasn’t the kind of public acceptance Quinn and Barr had in mind. But, as Gertrude Stein once said, “You can be a museum or you can be modern, but you can’t be both.”

There is also a Parisian side to Eakin’s story. Here again, the focus is mainly on two figures: the gallery owners Daniel-Henry Kahnweiler and Paul Rosenberg. (A third operator, a kind of freelance merchant and ladies’ man named Henri-Pierre Roché, who called his penis “my God” and sought out deals for Quinn, has a colorful role in the story. )

Among the circumstances to which cultural industries are forced to adapt, none played a more powerful role in the first half of the 20th century than geopolitics. Kahnweiler did not sell his artists’ work in France, even though his gallery was in Paris. His collectors were in Germany and Russia, countries where modern art was created and understood. But the First World War and the Russian Revolution closed these markets. As a German national, Kahnweiler even suffered the seizure of his collection by the French government.

A decade later, the rise to power of Stalin and then Hitler made conditions worse. The governments of both leaders made modern art a political target. (The Nazis called modern art KunstbolschewismusNazi Germany and the Soviet Union did more than just censor modern artists and writers. They imprisoned them and they killed them. After 1933, the year Hitler was appointed Chancellor of Germany, the United States suddenly became attractive as a place where modern art could be safely shown. Hitler and Stalin provided tailwinds to Quinn and Barr’s mission to modernize American taste.

Kahnweiler and Rosenberg are key to Eakin’s story because both men represented Picasso, and Eakin believes Quinn and Barr were determined to make Picasso the face of modern art in America. He says that Barr saw “Les Demoiselles d’Avignon”, in particular, as a painting that could define MoMAthe whole collection.

But Barr struggled to persuade his board to buy art, instead of borrowing it for exhibitions. The museum held highly successful retrospectives of Matisse in 1931 (thirty-six thousand visitors) and van Gogh in 1935 (a blockbuster, and truly the exhibition that established an audience for modern art in the United States), but the trustees refused to buy a single work by Matisse, and they passed on van Gogh’s “Starry Night,” an image that would one day adorn countless coffee cups.

MoMAThe efforts of to acquire “Les Demoiselles” is a good example of the twists and turns of the path from the artist to the public. When Picasso finished the painting, he let some people see it in his studio in Paris, where he gained what Eakin calls “cult status.” But the work was rarely exhibited publicly. Picasso liked to keep his finest pieces, and he kept “Les Demoiselles” rolled up for years. In 1924, he resold it to Jacques Doucet, a fashion designer. (Doucet’s wife refused to allow him to hang it in their living room. The news shocked her further.) Doucet paid twenty-four thousand francs, or about twelve hundred dollars at the time.

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Tycoon Dimitris Daskalopoulos offers huge amount of modern art | Art https://www.modernartforkids.com/tycoon-dimitris-daskalopoulos-offers-huge-amount-of-modern-art-art/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://www.modernartforkids.com/tycoon-dimitris-daskalopoulos-offers-huge-amount-of-modern-art-art/ In his airy office in northern Athens, Dimitris Daskalopoulos likes to highlight his Ego piece which can easily go unnoticed on a back wall. Viewed from afar, the three letters that are an integral part of the painting are barely noticeable, but what particularly appeals to the art collector is how they disappear when viewed […]]]>

In his airy office in northern Athens, Dimitris Daskalopoulos likes to highlight his Ego piece which can easily go unnoticed on a back wall.

Viewed from afar, the three letters that are an integral part of the painting are barely noticeable, but what particularly appeals to the art collector is how they disappear when viewed at no distance. “Look,” he says, his eyes twinkling as he enjoys the close-up of the work. “The ego is gone, there is nothing to see, nothing at all.”

The trick sums up the state of mind of the Greek industrialist. Three decades after he began assembling his internationally acclaimed collection — initially while running his family’s food empire — Daskalopoulos decided to offload.

Few people in the contemporary art world have accrued such assiduity: Louise Bourgeios, Marina Abramović, Helen Chadwick, Sarah Lucas and Matthew Barney are just a few of the artists whose works he has purchased.

Determined to give them a future beyond his life – and in keeping with his belief in sharing art with the public – the entrepreneur donates “the best part” of his collection. It’s a decision that has ramifications for art lovers on both sides of the Atlantic and the public institutions set to benefit from the donation.

Of the 350 works by 142 artists Daskalopoulos will part with, 110 will go to the Tate in London; 100 will be split between the Guggenheim in New York and the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, with the rest held by the National Museum of Contemporary Art, EMST, in Athens. In terms of scale and scope, few donations have been so generous.

For a man who admits that his instincts played a huge role in selecting the pieces of some of the world’s best-known contemporary artists, that’s an extraordinary feat.

Dimitris Daskalopoulos with boxes from his famous <a class=art collection.” src=”https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/f303383590e287a7fb9d47467c1af84aad006a7c/0_292_2000_2500/master/2000.jpg?width=300&quality=45&auto=format&fit=max&dpr=2&s=3b797479f3a692015e39856cb4245523″ height=”2500″ width=”2000″ loading=”lazy” class=”dcr-1989ovb”/>
Dimitris Daskalopoulos with boxes from his famous art collection. Photography: Natalaia Tsoukalas

This donation is also accompanied by the creation of a network of curators which, he hopes, will encourage exchanges, in particular between the Tate and the EMST, at a time when contemporary art in Greece is showing dynamism and promise.

Other than that, no conditions were set. Instead, it was the art and the “dialogue” he attempted to create within the collection that had the final say.

“I never felt like I owned the works,” he explains with unexpected joviality. “The concrete decision that I was going to give to museums was taken at least eight or nine years ago. I have always felt like a guardian, a guardian of other people’s creativity.

In any country, the giveaway would make waves. In Greece, whose culture has long been dominated by the glories of its ancient past, the gift has been magnified by choices that have also inspired admiration. Daskalopoulos acknowledges that his collecting practices were inspired by the writings of Nikos Kazantzakis, the Cretan author who spoke of the “brightness of life” between the “dark abyss” before birth and the “dark abyss” after birth. dead.

From the start, the collection focused on the elementary. Representations of the human body as a vehicle for existential, social and ideological struggles have taken a prominent place. Highlighting the universal issues of the human condition, loss, anguish, grief but also optimism, hope and the joys of life are constant themes in the artworks that have been exhibited around the world. entire.

But the collector also emphasized large-scale installations and sculptures that public institutions could ill afford. Many, he said, would never return to his house. “If you collect contemporary art, you can’t exclude [works] because they don’t fit in your house,” he laughs. “You should collect what artists do…my criteria has never been what I can put on my wall and it has never been to buy hot artists. It was about buying works that I think speak well together and reinforce the main message about what this collection is trying to explore.

<a class=Credit Card Destroying Machine by British artist Michael Landy, 2010, at the Dream On exhibition in Athens.” src=”https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/cde915e92d2d2296034df561d49bc071da058561/0_0_2000_3000/master/2000.jpg?width=300&quality=45&auto=format&fit=max&dpr=2&s=d355d259d1ab21c2c1fb7158be743ad1″ height=”3000″ width=”2000″ loading=”lazy” class=”dcr-1989ovb”/>
Credit Card Destroying Machine by British artist Michael Landy, 2010, at the Dream On exhibition in Athens. Photography: Natalia Tsoukala

This month, 18 pieces – some taking up to three weeks to assemble – were brought together in Dream On, a sold-out show at an old tobacco factory in Athens. This will be the first and last time the majority, including works by Damien Hirst and Michael Landy, will be seen in Greece. Most had been stored in warehouses across Europe.

It’s the prospect of breathing new life into the works that excites Daskalopoulos, who in 2014 founded Neon, an energetic NGO whose sole purpose is to broaden local appreciation of contemporary art and exhibit there. young Greeks.

“They will be reborn,” he says, adding that his motive for donating the four museums was driven largely by the specter of exposure. “They will become accessible to an even wider audience and will receive the necessary care to be preserved for future generations.”

At 65, Daskalopoulos has spent nearly half his life working on the collection. The donation could be the natural end of a passion that he says was never pursued for financial gain – but his interest in contemporary art, at least initially, was unexplained. Until his early thirties, traditional Greek abstract painting of the 50s and 60s adorned his home in Athens.

It wasn’t until he bought a Rebecca Horn in 1994 that more modern works beckoned him. “I slowly veered into contemporary art because it was possible to collect, but then I was fascinated by it because it’s the art of our time,” he recalls.

“The value of art lies in what is created in your heart and in your head. In this sense, my collection was not born of knowing or reading. It was gut, which is easier. You don’t have to read all that crap that curators and critics write.

Tomato Head (Burgundy) by Paul McCarthy, 1994, will go to the Tate in London. Photography: Photography: Douglas M Parker Studio/Courtesy of the artist and Hauser & Wirth, London and Zurich

A titan of Greek industry, who led the Hellenic Federation of Business as the country was plagued by economic crisis, Daskalopoulos recounts how his father, Aristides, started the dairy company, Delta, from a small shop in Athens . It’s a story of fortune that the entrepreneur, who has run a financial services and investment company since the sale of the food conglomerate in 2007, has not forgotten.

He credits the arts with making him more curious and a bolder risk-taker. “It takes you away from your own fixed ideas. That’s why I’m so grateful to contemporary art.

Daskalopoulos knows every piece in the collection. Giving the artwork away wasn’t easy, either emotionally or practically – he personally bought 99% of it and remembers how he felt when he first saw the items time.

Knowing that he will be there to taste his civic engagement, and enjoy the future life of the works, is more satisfying than any feeling of rupture. While donating to four museums in three countries on two continents has not been easy – the paperwork has been painful – the idea that a private collection will soon become a public resource has been so much better than knowing that a much of it is hoarded in boxes.

“There will be exhibitions of works of art, there will be artists’ rooms. There will be dialogues and there will be joint museum initiatives…so I will see these works being active while I am still here.

And if there ever was a rainy day, there are another 150 pieces – including gems from Robert Gober and Bruce Nauman – in his wallet. Its offices, located on a suburban street, are furnished with artwork, including several US dollar coins staged partly as a joke because it is its financial services headquarters. “More, absolutely, is less, and less is more,” he agrees, looking at his track Ego. “I kept works with which I like to live… maybe [there’ll be] a second wave of donations some time later.

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The National Gallery of Modern Art will host Museum Night on Saturday – The New Indian Express https://www.modernartforkids.com/the-national-gallery-of-modern-art-will-host-museum-night-on-saturday-the-new-indian-express/ Sat, 25 Jun 2022 03:06:00 +0000 https://www.modernartforkids.com/the-national-gallery-of-modern-art-will-host-museum-night-on-saturday-the-new-indian-express/ By Express press service NEW DELHI: The National Gallery of Modern Art will host a Museum Night on Saturday from 6-8 p.m. at its premises to experience creative eclecticism and a twilight stroll through the sculpture garden. Adwait Gadanayak, General Manager of the Gallery will be present at the event. The Night of Museums will […]]]>

By Express press service

NEW DELHI: The National Gallery of Modern Art will host a Museum Night on Saturday from 6-8 p.m. at its premises to experience creative eclecticism and a twilight stroll through the sculpture garden. Adwait Gadanayak, General Manager of the Gallery will be present at the event.

The Night of Museums will offer a screening of Satyajit Ray’s documentary on Berode Behari Mukherjee. A guided tour of Nicholas Roerich’s section of Kshetragya (current exhibition) with historian and curator Vladimir Zaitsev is also planned.

The gallery has two ongoing exhibitions called Hastantaran (in transmission) and Kshetragya (The Enlightened). Hastantaran: In Transmission is a Nandalal Bose retrospective currently on display in the temporary gallery. “The NGMA is privileged to hold the largest collection of his works under one roof, many of which are on display.

The artist spearheaded a cultural renaissance aligned with Gandhi’s ideas. The piece de resistance is his rendition of Bapu (Mahatama Gandhi), an image engraved on linoleum that immortalized the Salt Satyagraha,” a press release said.

Also on display are his legendary Haripura posters from 1938, commissioned by the Mahatma. The importance of his contribution to the Independence Movement was recognized when he was asked to illustrate the pages of the Constitution of India, the statement said.

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A new look Jaipur House, showcasing modern Indian art https://www.modernartforkids.com/a-new-look-jaipur-house-showcasing-modern-indian-art/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 07:20:06 +0000 https://www.modernartforkids.com/a-new-look-jaipur-house-showcasing-modern-indian-art/ New Delhi: In front of the majestic India Gate is another royal structure with an impressive facade, the Jaipur House. Once the residence in New Delhi of the royal family of Jaipur, the building has already hosted several royal gatherings and large receptions. It is loaded with great historical significance. However, today the building houses […]]]>

New Delhi: In front of the majestic India Gate is another royal structure with an impressive facade, the Jaipur House. Once the residence in New Delhi of the royal family of Jaipur, the building has already hosted several royal gatherings and large receptions. It is loaded with great historical significance. However, today the building houses another kind of royalty, the artistic works of the great masters of modern Indian art.

Jaipur House was transformed into the National Gallery of Modern Art in 1956. Beneath its high ceilings and red sandstone walls, several eminent artists who defined Indian modern art remain alive. As soon as you enter the Jaipur house, you are introduced to the many artists whose work is displayed in the gallery. The recently renovated building, while retaining the architectural value of the space, now exhibits the works of several masters of modern art in different sections.

From the central dome of the house, which sometimes hosts a virtual exhibition of the work of different artists, one can find his way upstairs to the individual galleries housing the works of artists such as Amrita Shergil, Nicolas Roerich, Jamini Roy, Ramkinkar Baij and Abindranath Tagore among others. As you go, you can see the works of art, the portraits of the masters of their art and the beautiful walls of Jaipur’s house adorning and complementing each other.

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In each section now dedicated to a particular artist, from inside the large halls to outside on their walls, the work of these artists is exhibited, accompanied by their portraits. It’s almost as if in these rooms, next to these works, the artists still reside. Observing their work carefully is almost synonymous with traveling with these artists, witnessing the evolution of their work.

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Today, art connoisseurs, enthusiasts, critics, appreciators and even those who know nothing about art, can witness the beauty of modern Indian art in all its glory. A major credit to this goes to the work that went into making the display of these works of art just as glorious. Each section of the Jaipur house has been altered to compliment the artist and his art displayed there. While Shergil’s hallways are soaked in red color, Roerich’s work is displayed in dark blue rooms with paintings illuminated from below and Jamini Roy’s work resides in beautiful wooden rooms.

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In the case of Amrita Shergil, the naïveté of a young but graceful artist can be seen through the early works she made in Europe. One can also witness the change of subjects and treatment of her art as she returns to India to discover her Indian roots. On one of the walls, next to her European-style portrait, is her quote which reads: “I can only paint in India. Elsewhere I am not natural, I have no self-confidence. Europe belongs to Picasso, Matisse, Braque and many others. India belongs only to me.”

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When one steps into the room displaying the work of Nicholas Roerich, the breathtaking beauty of the Himalayas and North Indian mountain ranges in his paintings will surely consume you. The same goes for the works of masters such as Jamini Roy, Abindranath Tagore, Ramkinker Baij and Sailoz Mookherjea and several others.

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Calder’s sculpture helped spawn modern art – Jamestown Sun https://www.modernartforkids.com/calders-sculpture-helped-spawn-modern-art-jamestown-sun/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://www.modernartforkids.com/calders-sculpture-helped-spawn-modern-art-jamestown-sun/ Movement draws attention to itself. It is mathematical as well as artistic. It’s scientific and natural. It can create beauty as well as chaos. In the art world, however, it took a Pennsylvania-born artist, Alexander Calder, in the early 20th century to add movement (kinesis) to the art world. Considered “the father of kinetic sculpture”, […]]]>

Movement draws attention to itself. It is mathematical as well as artistic. It’s scientific and natural. It can create beauty as well as chaos. In the art world, however, it took a Pennsylvania-born artist, Alexander Calder, in the early 20th century to add movement (kinesis) to the art world.

Considered “the father of kinetic sculpture”, Calder’s family was artistic and creative. In his biography, he reportedly started out with a pair of pliers in his hand, making doll jewelry for his sister.

Like so many artists of his time, contact with other artists inspired change and inclusion. Calder’s greatest influence was Piet Mondrian, whose paintings were blocks of color in black lines arranged in ordered constructions on canvas. Calder took the vivid colors that Mondrian “suspended” on his canvases and imagined them floating in the air.

Like many of his contemporaries, including the “father” of Cubism, Pablo Picasso, Calder was embracing new concepts in art. Combining Mondrian’s special options and Picasso’s abstraction, Calder saw sculpture as a way to give art wings to soar from the pedestal. He could adopt the colors and asymmetrical balance of Mondrian, but instead of making the elements rectilinear, they could be cubist, more abstract.

Calder’s mobiles stopped the audience in their tracks. Heads held high, mouths open and if there was the slightest breeze, the sound of metal shapes bumping into each other would transform visitors for hours. He cut the brightly colored solid shapes out of metal and lightly bent wire to suspend the shapes to maximize the illusion of flight. One of his largest stabiles is in the Chicago Art Institute as well as works in nearby Schaumberg.

His influence was quickly felt in floral design. Accepted as an “official” ribbon of the National Council of State Garden Clubs Inc. The mid-20th century saw a number of artistic additions to official (accredited) flower shows. Calder’s concept of mobiles was one. Floral displays began to include “modern” designs, an almost total “line” with a few flowers or plant matter hanging in the air. Mondrian’s asymmetrical color concept also appeared in flower show niches. Between the late 1950s and 1980s, it was lovely to hear comments from visitors when they encountered these linear, modern designs: “Is that a flower arrangement? Sounds like a piece of junk to me!!!” (The reference he was referring to was from one of my own “Creativity” ribbon winners, and his remark was among the kindest. Hearing the feedback was always a entertaining part of flower shows at the time.)

Like Calder’s originals, the ladies or gents who crafted their “Creativity” award works caused a stir as people stood back with their mouths hanging open, trying to figure out what it was, and why the hell anyone would someone put something like THIS in a flower show and label it as a flower arrangement? But they were and still are considered for specific ribbons.

As all great art is supposed to do, these mobiles (whether brightly painted steel shapes on wires or an allium flower hanging from a fishing line) prompted questions, discussions, curiosity and, better still, conflicts. Twentieth-century artists sought to create conversation and challenge the status quo. Instead of writing about it, they painted, sculpted and even gave movement to what had been the most traditional examples of the art. Calder, Mondrian, Picasso and others paved the way for the modernism we know today as “mid-century modern”.

If anyone has an article for this column, please send it to Sharon Cox, PO Box 1559, Jamestown, ND 58402-1559.

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rettberg: Modern art by KK Hebbar, Ambadas Khobragade at auction from the collection of German gallerist Ute Rettberg https://www.modernartforkids.com/rettberg-modern-art-by-kk-hebbar-ambadas-khobragade-at-auction-from-the-collection-of-german-gallerist-ute-rettberg/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 06:10:00 +0000 https://www.modernartforkids.com/rettberg-modern-art-by-kk-hebbar-ambadas-khobragade-at-auction-from-the-collection-of-german-gallerist-ute-rettberg/ “I was so convinced of the value of Indian art and that it is equal to all others and that someone had to show it,” says Ute Rettberg, the pioneering German gallery owner who played an important role in the expansion of the Indian art market abroad. . Sotheby’s London has launched an online auction […]]]>
“I was so convinced of the value of Indian art and that it is equal to all others and that someone had to show it,” says Ute Rettberg, the pioneering German gallery owner who played an important role in the expansion of the Indian art market abroad. . Sotheby’s London has launched an online auction of more than 80 works from Rettberg’s personal collection, ‘The Surya Collection: Property from Mrs. Ute Rettberg’ includes paintings, drawings, prints and sculptures which Rettberg signed surrounds for nearly 50 years.

The sale features works by important figures in the field of modern Indian art whom Rettberg also considered friends, with pieces by KK Hebbar and Ambadas Khobragade – considered a true pioneer of color and form – among the strong points. As well as showcasing established Indian artists, the auction offers an exciting opportunity to discover little-seen and rare works, carefully curated by Rettberg’s keen eye and expertise.

Ute Rettberg lived in Mumbai in the mid-1960s where she worked as one of the first women in the German diplomatic service. She and her husband were newlyweds, drawn to the vibrant colors of contemporary Indian art, and began buying works by talented young artists to decorate their Juhu Beach residence.

“Since I lived and worked in India – I came to India in 1964 and got married in 1966, and we started decorating our house. Everyone was buying antiques but I felt a bit too young and thought it was better to support living artists who have to make a living. When we came back to Germany and decorated our new house here, everyone said, wow, what colorful paintings, and asked me to bring some when I went to India,” she told ET.

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January ’78, Biren De, 1978

In the early 1970s, Kekoo Gandhy (founder of the Chemould Gallery in Mumbai) began sending works by Ute to be exhibited at her new Surya Galerie, based in Freinsheim near Frankfurt. Reviewing photographs taken with artists at the time, Ute recalls, “Sometimes I marvel at how young I looked, that I dared to do all this. But I was so convinced of the value and that Indian art is equal to all others and someone had to show it.

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Rettberg went on to form close and lasting friendships with Indian artists such as KK Hebbar, Satish Panchal and Surya Prakash, many of whom would stay with her in Germany for months and exhibit their works at Surya Gallery. Rettberg credits Hebbar for the refinement of his tastes: “We met Krishna K. Hebbar, who in many meetings and discussions over the years sharpened my eye and my sense of quality, good craftsmanship and authentic forms of expression.”

Hebbar’s artwork Untitled, (Versova Beach) is one of Ute’s favorites, and today she remembers him drawing it at the beach, where people were drying fish and where his wife picked up fenugreek, on an invitation card he had with him.

“Some people thought it was out of the ordinary but for the most part the reception was very good. The press was interested, people thought oh, wonderful, something colorful and exciting in this dull landscape Everyone was excited and so the gallery continued, and was still packed, people came from all over Germany, even from France.

From mezzoprints to wall hangings and neo-tantric art, the selection of works offered in this extraordinary sole proprietor sale form a time capsule of a unique period in modern Indian art and testify to Ms. Ute Rettberg.

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How DAG’s Ashish Anand makes modern art accessible to everyone https://www.modernartforkids.com/how-dags-ashish-anand-makes-modern-art-accessible-to-everyone/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 02:58:39 +0000 https://www.modernartforkids.com/how-dags-ashish-anand-makes-modern-art-accessible-to-everyone/ In March, Ashish Anand, CEO and Managing Director of DAG, staged one of its most ambitious exhibitions to date. Title Iconic masterpieces of modern Indian art, the exhibition, held in the gallery’s two new spaces at the Taj Mahal Palace Hotel, Mumbai, showcased 50 rare works by 50 artists spanning 200 years. It offered a […]]]>

In March, Ashish Anand, CEO and Managing Director of DAG, staged one of its most ambitious exhibitions to date. Title Iconic masterpieces of modern Indian art, the exhibition, held in the gallery’s two new spaces at the Taj Mahal Palace Hotel, Mumbai, showcased 50 rare works by 50 artists spanning 200 years. It offered a series of firsts. It was the first time, for example, that Western orientalists such as Marius Bauer shared a space with Indian masters such as FN Souza and Ramkinkar Baij. Masterpieces were on display such as an 1805 Company painting of Agra Fort; The poet, a cement sculpture by Baij hailed as the first modern Indian sculpture; and Souza’s Assis Nude On A Blue Armchair.

Anand was looking for a new space after the Kala Ghoda gallery’s lease ended in 2020. “We looked for a long time. However, we couldn’t find a space as good as those in Delhi at The Claridges and Janpath. For the works of great masters, large locations are needed. And the Taj Mahal Palace offered exactly that,” says Anand, 51.

The roots of the DAG were sown in the 1980s, when Anand’s family moved from Amritsar, Punjab, to Delhi during that state’s militancy phase. His mother, Rama, who had a keen interest in the arts, opened the gallery – then called the Delhi Art Gallery – in the village of Hauz Khas in 1993. Anand, who had dropped out of secondary school and was working in ready-to-wear, took over in 1996. Today, the arts organization – renamed DAG – has galleries in Delhi, Mumbai and New York, a strong publications division, numerous museum collaborations and a partnership recently concluded public-private in the form of the Drishyakala Museum in Red Fort, Delhi.

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The early years were difficult for Anand, who had no previous experience in the arts. A 2018 QG The article notes that he realized early on that while the wealthy wanted art, there was no infrastructure to meet that demand. However, bridging this gap has not been easy. Anand had to train his own eye first. “The first years were exciting. I traveled the country far and wide to build the collection. It may sound cliché to say that I led a nomadic life, but that’s what it was: traveling about 25 days a month,” he recalls.

His plan, even at first, was to focus on the underrepresented – the masters of modern Indian art – who for various reasons had not gotten their due. “I systematically set out to research and collect them with a view to creating the long-awaited market for them,” says Anand. While buying the work of lesser-known artists has become common business practice for galleries today, that was not the case when Anand started.

At the time, the market was limited, and we were only talking about 10 to 15 artists. Its focus continues to be the underrepresented artist; he buys the work of those whom he believes have contributed greatly to Indian modernism but have not been promoted. His first purchase was a “delicious” watercolor painting by Ramkinkar Baij in 1996. He was so excited at the time that he boarded a train from Puri, Odisha, to Howrah Station in Kolkata, with the work under the arm, to celebrate. At another time, he finalized a deal for some works by Asit Haldar although he was suffering from a high fever at the time.

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“Right from the start, I decided never to take on consignment work, which in 1996 was the norm. My friends and family warned me of the risk, but I was convinced not only of the depth of the Indian market, but also of DAG’s ability to build a qualitative collection,” says Anand.

Over the years, it has acquired rare works by Chittaprosad as well as the studio of filmmaker Nemai Ghosh, while building up a significant collection of Nandalal Bose. He feels proud to have highlighted masters such as Chittaprosad and Rabin Mondal through large-scale retrospectives and in-depth publications. “MV Dhurandhar is another example. We exhibited our collection at the National Gallery of Modern Art in Mumbai in 2018, when the artist was little known.

An analysis of the values ​​the artist commands on the auction market today will tell you how recognized Dhurandhar is today,” he adds. This has also contributed to the international recognition of some of these artists. For example, Chittaprosad, which documented the Great Bengal Famine of 1943-44 in harrowing sketches and drawings, has been exhibited at documenta in Berlin and the Great Hunger Museum of Ireland in the United States. Mondal opened to rave reviews in Shanghai, China.

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Data on the size of the Indian market remains poor, perhaps because it is still so small compared to more mature arts ecosystems in the US, UK and China. However, it is full of opportunities waiting to be realized. “In this space, we believe DAG has become associated with quality and value. As a result, our buyers can be found all over the world, sometimes in the most surprising places. ‘among them tend to be located in metros, some also come from small provincial areas,’ he says.

Internationally, New York remains an important outpost, with buyers also based in London, Hong Kong, Dubai and other places with large Indian diasporas. “DAG has grown steadily over the past few years, with the gallery showing robust growth of 35% compounded over the past two years,” adds Anand. The targeted interest comes from a mature age group, between 45 and 65, but there has been a steady trend of millennials entering the market. This bodes well for the art industry as a whole. Anand calls DAG a “very large company in terms of personnel”, with more than 160 employees. “That’s a lot for an arts institution. At the rate we’re growing, we’ll be a 450-person company by the end of next year,” he says.

In the space in which DAG works, progressives – Souza, SH Raza, MF Husain as core members and associate artists such as Tyeb Mehta, VS Gaitonde, Akbar Padamsee, Ram Kumar and Krishen Khanna – hold the market share the highest. “While they have achieved the highest prices and continue to do so, we are now seeing significant interest in what have been termed ‘second tier’ artists, such as MV Dhurandhar, GR Santosh, Avinash Chandra , KS Kulkarni. There has also been a resurgence of pre-moderns, such as Jamini Roy, Raja Ravi Varma, the first school in Bengal, all of whom are emerging as market leaders,” says Anand.

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Although the gallery has focused on 20th century Indian art since its inception, this is starting to change. Over the past five years, DAG has brought to light 18th and 19th century art – including works by visiting European artists and Company paintings – that have not had their due. “In doing so, our view of 20th century art will in no way be compromised,” he says. Some of the recent exhibitions of art from this period have focused, for example, on works by Balthazar Solvyns and paintings by the Bird Company of India. A clear demarcation can be seen in the galleries themselves, with Claridges focusing on this period.

Anand now wants to create more engagement and bring the art to more people. Museum projects are moving in this direction. Take, for example, India’s first public-private collaboration in the arts, which began in January 2019 with the Drishyakala Museum. Located within the grounds of the Red Fort, a Unesco World Heritage monument, the project was a partnership between the Archaeological Survey of India and DAG.

Drishyakala, which closed on April 13, featured four exhibitions that included a comprehensive overview of the nine Indian artists in the National Treasure as well as the first viewing of the 144 complete works of 18th-century aquatints by Thomas Daniell and William Daniell. “I would say it is the most successful public-private partnership in the field of art and culture. People from all walks of life have visited Drishyakala and been blown away. Before covid-19, we received an average of 4,000 people a day,” says Anand.

In 2019, DAG entered into a partnership with the Union Ministry of Textiles to establish a museum just outside Varanasi, Uttar Pradesh. The rotating exhibit was titled Eternal Benares. In 2020, he organized Ghare Baire, several exhibits on 19th and 20th century Bengal art, in the renovated Currency Building in Kolkata. He went on hiatus in November 2021, hoping to return with new perspectives. Anand hopes for partnerships in Tier 2 cities, not only for DAG but for other private arts institutions.

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“DAG’s long-term perspective of democratizing art will remain at the forefront of its activities, be it historical conservation exercises, its education initiatives for school and college students, from its tactile programming for the visually impaired, its publishing and filmmaking programs, a lively lineup of lectures and organized walks, and the building of relationships with institutions and museums around the world,” explains Anand.

Over the past five years, he has tried to balance the commercial with non-commercial ventures, such as collaborations with museums and charity auctions. “Having the commercial arm subsidize the non-commercial is a vision DAG is moving toward,” he adds. Over the past year, the DAG team has been working on a new website that will host not only content, but also online auctions. With this, DAG’s auction arm hopes to get into 20th century art at lower prices, pegged at one lakh upwards. “It will bring this period of art to a wider audience. We made a few such sales during the pandemic, which were a huge success,” says Anand.

In-depth publications are also a priority area. These have been in English, but the plan is to venture into Indian languages ​​as well. Workshops are planned to use art as therapy for the elderly, defense personnel, sex workers. “These are not typical buyers. For them, we want to use art to heal. We will do this much more aggressively in the future,” he says.

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Top 10 Secrets of the Museum of Modern Art in New York (MoMA) https://www.modernartforkids.com/top-10-secrets-of-the-museum-of-modern-art-in-new-york-moma/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 09:15:04 +0000 https://www.modernartforkids.com/top-10-secrets-of-the-museum-of-modern-art-in-new-york-moma/ More than two million people visit New York’s Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) each year – and it’s not hard to see why. This powerful art institution was the city’s first museum devoted exclusively to modern art. Inside its hallowed halls, it houses masterpieces by some of the greatest artists of all time, including Henri […]]]>

More than two million people visit New York’s Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) each year – and it’s not hard to see why. This powerful art institution was the city’s first museum devoted exclusively to modern art. Inside its hallowed halls, it houses masterpieces by some of the greatest artists of all time, including Henri Matisse, Pablo Picasso and Vincent Van Gogh, to name a few. Its sculpture garden designed by legendary architect Philip Johnson is an attraction in itself.

Following a $450 million expansion by Diller Scofidio + Renfro in conjunction with Gensler to their space on West 53rd St, which added 45,000 square feet of space in 2019, the museum has one-third the space of gallery longer than the original 80-year-old floor plan. The recent reopening allowed visitors to discover the new David Geffen wing – an expansion that occurred with the takeover of the former American Folk Art Museum on West 53rd Street. Visitors also have access to MoMA PS1, based just across the East River in Long Island City, Queens, with their ticket to MoMA. MoMA PS1 exclusively features works by contemporary artists – and was the first non-profit museum in the United States to focus solely on contemporary art. MoMA as an institution continues to grow bigger and more important than ever. Yet, even if you have visited the museum several times, you may have missed some of its most curious works or overlooked part of its history. We’ve unearthed ten fascinating secrets about the museum, from its founders to its contact with the Oscars.

1. MoMA was founded by three women

  • Abby AldrichRockefeller
  • Lillie P. happiness
  • Mary Quinn Sullivan

The MoMA is one of the most important art centers museums in New York – and was the city’s first museum dedicated to modern art. It may therefore be a little surprising that it was founded not by wealthy men like JP Morgan (one of the founders of the Metropolitan Museum of Art) but by three women. Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, Lillie P. Bliss and Mary Quinn Sullivan decided during a lunch in 1928 to create a museum focused on modern art, inspired by European institutions like the Luxembourg Museum in Paris.

Less than a year later, the Museum of Modern Art opened on the 12th floor of a Fifth Avenue office building. The museum depended on donations, as there was no money for purchases. The first works to join the collection were eight prints and drawings donated by Paul J. Sachs. When Lillie P. Bliss died, she bequeathed her collection of Post-Impressionist works, many of which are still on display at the museum today.

Next: #2 MoMA is located on the former site of the Rockefeller townhouse
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A new contemporary Asian restaurant will open next to the Museum of Modern Art https://www.modernartforkids.com/a-new-contemporary-asian-restaurant-will-open-next-to-the-museum-of-modern-art/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 17:45:26 +0000 https://www.modernartforkids.com/a-new-contemporary-asian-restaurant-will-open-next-to-the-museum-of-modern-art/ Named after the architectural masterpiece in which it sits, 53 is a new contemporary Asian restaurant opening in the 82-story residential tower designed by Jean Nouvel at 53 West 53rd Street, next to the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in Midtown Manhattan. 53 marks the fourth destination concept in New York from restaurateur Ahmass Fakahany, […]]]>

Named after the architectural masterpiece in which it sits, 53 is a new contemporary Asian restaurant opening in the 82-story residential tower designed by Jean Nouvel at 53 West 53rd Street, next to the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in Midtown Manhattan. 53 marks the fourth destination concept in New York from restaurateur Ahmass Fakahany, founder and CEO of the Altamarea Group, which includes Michelin-starred restaurants Marea and Ai Fiori and Morini. A passion project in mind for several years, with the opening of 53, Fakahany artfully blends the varied taste profiles of Asian cuisine – from its almost 10 years of living in Asia – with the ethos and artistic vibe of New York. , in a modern style. , living environment on three levels.

“For some time I have wanted to open in New York, an elevated Asian dining experience with different flavors and tastes in a comfortable and chic atmosphere, similar to many wonderful places I have visited in large hotels or venues in key cities across Asia,” says Ahmass Fakahany. “Like the heart of Marea, 53 is a New York restaurant serving exceptional authentic cuisine to a global clientele. I have always been an avid supporter of New York and its resilience, and after all the stress of the past two years, I want our guests to relax and enjoy themselves at 53.”

Fakahany collaborates with world-renowned Singaporean chef, Akmal Anuar, who ran one of the world’s top 50 restaurants Pellegrino in Singapore (Asia No. 1) and created Asian restaurant sensation, 3 Fils, the first 2022 winner of the best restaurant in Pellegrino. World’s 50 Best for Middle East & Africa (MENA #1). Chef Akmal began his career in the kitchen of his parents’ street vendor in Singapore. More recently, in addition to working around the world with top chefs in Spain, Australia and Japan, Chef Akmal has been recognized for creating some of the best contemporary Asian restaurants in Dubai.

“Ahmass and I have known each other for many years, as we first met while he was still living in Asia. It is a dream that our connection will come full circle and that I can bring the dishes of my youth and my history to an amazing and electric city like New York,” shares Chef Akmal.

A fusion of his education and culinary experience, Chef Akmal’s menu for 53 will feature an exquisite range of Chinese and Japanese influenced dishes, as well as the flavors of Southeast Asia. Unlike more typical Asian cuisine, Menu 53 will be categorized by temperature and preparation: Cold, Hot, Steamed, Grilled, Clay Pot and Wok. Colorful and exotic, with dishes of varying sizes, each menu item will be prepared with only the freshest, seasonal and local ingredients. The intent of the menu is that it is best enjoyed as a multi-course experience, which can be layered for a more leisurely and flowing meal for guests. Even a table of two has the opportunity to try between five and seven dishes during a dinner.

Joining Chef Akmal to lead the kitchen is Mark Yu, who also comes with a career full of culinary experience, including his most recent role as executive sous chef at Pastis and senior chef positions at Catch and Harlow. At New York. The culinary team will prepare dishes such as hand-sliced ​​dry-aged beef carpaccio with aji-panca and peppercorn dressing, Toro tartare topped with sustainable caviar from the cold section and decadent truffle egg custard with foie gras and littleneck clams in the Hot section. Featured in the Grill section, customers are encouraged to enjoy Sambal Skate, which at 53 is wrapped in a bamboo leaf and served with homemade cincalok sauce. From there, servers will guide guests on their journey through 53’s menu, from Steam menu options to Clay Pot and Wok selections with items such as Steamed Turbot with Ginger and Oil of garlic or Hainanese chicken soaked in Shaoxing wine, each dish comes with more delicate dishes. precision than the next, and each bite adds even more to the customer’s multi-sensory 53 experience.

To bring the entire guest experience to life, Susan Lee, Executive Director of Operations, will lead the restaurant with the assistance of 53’s General Manager, Alex Magat (formerly General Manager of Bar Blondeau).

Given its iconic address at the foot of the 1,050-foot-tall sculptural tower, art is intrinsic to the dining DNA at 53, with several MoMA gallery levels located directly above the restaurant. In keeping with its location at 53 West 53, Fakahany has entered into a unique curatorial partnership with the world-renowned Friedrich Petzel Gallery. This special artistic collaboration intriguingly blurs the lines between gallery and restaurant, creating an immersive dining experience that showcases cutting-edge artists. Friedrich Petzel will curate the art on display throughout the space and design a rotating installation of works every 3-5 months. The first artist in residence will be Jorge Pardo, followed by Ross Bleckner. A combination of artists will also be included periodically.

“We are thrilled to partner with the caliber of Fakahany and Altamarea in such an exciting new endeavor where together we can reinvent the dining experience through a program that draws inspiration from the special and eclectic collection of artists represented by our gallery,” says Friedrich. Petzel.

For the interior, Fakahany selected ICRAVE, the leading innovation and design firm based in Miami and New York, to bring their vision to life for the 11,000 square foot space that spans multiple levels. By reinventing Asian design elements, ICRAVE sought to create a bold yet intimate ambiance for the restaurant. Key to 53’s aesthetic is its chic, modern art design that weaves the vertical structure into an integrated cascade of sweeping blades – a representation of the “chi” or energy that moves throughout the restaurant. Layers of light capture the different surfaces of the blades, and the blades’ nine edge banding colors are inspired by elements of Chinese palaces and gardens often seen in modern artwork. Guests move through a series of “galleries,” moving from scene to scene and appearing to inhabit the artwork. The sunken, double-height main dining room is a landscaped diorama and will be visible from street level, presenting an aerial view and revealing a beautiful modern room bustling by day, glowing by night.

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Lladró’s Guest is a sculptural masterpiece for lovers of modern art https://www.modernartforkids.com/lladros-guest-is-a-sculptural-masterpiece-for-lovers-of-modern-art/ Sat, 04 Jun 2022 09:20:21 +0000 https://www.modernartforkids.com/lladros-guest-is-a-sculptural-masterpiece-for-lovers-of-modern-art/ Ten years ago, renowned Spanish artist-designer Jaime Hayon designed The Guest, a sculptural masterpiece that has become Lladró’s most captivating character. A multi-faceted work of art, The Guest has since been an inspirational blank canvas for famous artists of different nationalities to tell their stories through iconographic languages. Jaime started the collection with a focus […]]]>

Ten years ago, renowned Spanish artist-designer Jaime Hayon designed The Guest, a sculptural masterpiece that has become Lladró’s most captivating character.

A multi-faceted work of art, The Guest has since been an inspirational blank canvas for famous artists of different nationalities to tell their stories through iconographic languages.

Jaime started the collection with a focus on craftsmanship, drawing inspiration from his personal experiences. His repertoire includes the design of numerous pieces of furniture, shoes, watches, lighting, art installations, ceramics and other home accessories. Named one of the 100 most important designers of our time by Times magazine, Jaime’s groundbreaking vision blurs the lines between art, decor and design. The Madrid artist speaks through The Guest, winking at the themes historically favored by Lladró, such as love and childhood.

Ricardo Cavolo’s guest

Pushing the boundaries with a subtle sense of humor, Jaime finds his creative spark ignited by Lladró’s unique craftsmanship. “I wanted to be part of of the company evolution; my intention was never a revolution. For several generations, its craftsmen have acquired the mastery of an art and techniques. My task was to add that extra contemporary touch,” he explains.

Artists influenced by the Lladró craftsmen’s passion for detail include Tim Biskup, Devilrobots, Gary Baseman, Rolito, Paul Smith and many more. Each brings to the table new concepts, designs and colors on the same canvas. Through inspired collaborations, each creates irreverent yet distinguished figurines that have become icons of the 21st century.

Lladró The orange guest
Lladró The orange guest

“Today, the ability of art to make us dream, imagine, reflect and even aspire is really important. Artistic explorations testify more and more to this particular way of projecting oneself into realities that move us and make us feel,” shares Jaime. The guest reflects his desire to demonstrate that tradition is open to experimentation and can lead to unexpected and singularly original conceptual paths.

In The Guest project, there is something exceptional that appeals to everyone. American artist Tim Biskup expresses his vision of a “populist aesthetic”, playing with patterns of skulls and raindrops in connection with nature. Conversely, the Japanese design team Devilrobots uses cheerful colors, polka dots and stripes with the purity of black to create fun, emotive and extravagant expressions in keeping with their expertise in toy design.

Meanwhile, eclectic artist Gary Baseman lends his “adorably perverted” vision to creating beautifully bizarre otherworldly iterations of The Guest that are certain to serve as iconic conversation starters in any space. of life. Rolito’s guest imagines a superhero of the night, protecting sleepers and warding off nightmares with his trusty sidekick. The celebrated French designer and illustrator borrowed inspiration for the concept from his young son to interpret the statuesque pair with a comforting grip.

British designer Paul Smith took a different approach. “These are pieces I would love to have in my home. Upbeat, fun, cheerful, full of color and humor is what makes them Forge“, mentions the creator. Sprinkled with confetti and covered in cat and dog masks, Smith’s whimsical expressions blend tradition and modernity with ease. “Each one is created and painted by hand in the Lladró workshops in Valencia, which is increasingly unusual in our computerized and mechanized world,” concludes Paul.

Lladró’s cooperative effort with international artists is nothing short of extraordinary. Porcelain experts navigate their own unique artisanal processes through close collaboration, drawing on nearly 70 years of in-depth knowledge as decorators and craftsmen working materials by hand, from chemistry to modelling, carving, relief, engraving and painting. Age-old craftsmanship and techniques remain alive, transforming porcelain into delicate, fun, elegant and groundbreaking works of art. The artisanal process behind The Guest, with the countless steps involved, proves how rewarding and fruitful the tandem of contemporary design and traditional endeavors is.

“Understanding, appreciating and learning from craftsmanship has always been a crucial element of my work, which is a mixture of tradition and culture. To preserve this source of learning, it is necessary to combine it with design, in view to advance craft techniques and contextualize their value in the present,” says Jaime.

Lladró shop at Bangsar shopping center
Lladró shop at Bangsar shopping center

This spring, Lladró is opening its first store at Bangsar Shopping Center in Kuala Lumpur. Designed according to the concept created in collaboration with renowned architect and interior designer Héctor Ruiz Velázquez, the stunning boutique is the first of its kind in the country. Aimed at those with sophisticated tastes and a deep appreciation for enduring and modern artistic expressions, Lladró is ready to share its artisan wonders with a new generation of enthusiasts.

This story was first published on Prestige Malaysia

(All images: Lladró)

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